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The Night of Broken Glass, Eyewitness Accounts of Kristallnacht

The Night of Broken Glass, Eyewitness Accounts of Kristallnacht 332 Book reviews transcended the geographical and chronological ends of the French colonial empire, an aspect that the diversity of The French Colonial Mind’s essays also makes clear. Collectively, the wide range of contributions gives the reader the full sense that colonial minds are neither homogenous nor unchangeable mental representations: circumstantial and individual uses of common cultural codes can generate different ways of thinking about the empire and attitudes can change in response to colonial experiences. The topics of each chapter are clearly introduced but the essays in The French Colonial Mind are obviously brief: the reader leaves with as many questions as answers and eager to know more. A section with suggestions for further reading or a more complete list of bibliographic references to complement the ones mentioned in the endnotes would have been especially useful as a ready reference for the more curious reader. Such minor quibbles aside, the only weakness of The French Colonial Mind is perhaps the lack of a transnational perspective in many of its essays. Considering Martin Thomas’s remarks about the importance of looking beyond the internal dynamics of colonial empires in his introduction to the first volume, the reader might expect more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Review of History Taylor & Francis

The Night of Broken Glass, Eyewitness Accounts of Kristallnacht

European Review of History , Volume 20 (2): 2 – Apr 1, 2013
2 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-8293
eISSN
1350-7486
DOI
10.1080/13507486.2013.773741
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

332 Book reviews transcended the geographical and chronological ends of the French colonial empire, an aspect that the diversity of The French Colonial Mind’s essays also makes clear. Collectively, the wide range of contributions gives the reader the full sense that colonial minds are neither homogenous nor unchangeable mental representations: circumstantial and individual uses of common cultural codes can generate different ways of thinking about the empire and attitudes can change in response to colonial experiences. The topics of each chapter are clearly introduced but the essays in The French Colonial Mind are obviously brief: the reader leaves with as many questions as answers and eager to know more. A section with suggestions for further reading or a more complete list of bibliographic references to complement the ones mentioned in the endnotes would have been especially useful as a ready reference for the more curious reader. Such minor quibbles aside, the only weakness of The French Colonial Mind is perhaps the lack of a transnational perspective in many of its essays. Considering Martin Thomas’s remarks about the importance of looking beyond the internal dynamics of colonial empires in his introduction to the first volume, the reader might expect more

Journal

European Review of HistoryTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 2013

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