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The Prevention of Suicidal Behavior: Evidence for the Efficacy of Clinical and Community-based Programs

The Prevention of Suicidal Behavior: Evidence for the Efficacy of Clinical and Community-based... Int. 1. Ment. Health, Vol. 21, No.3, pp. 69-87 M. E. Sharpe, Inc., 1992 RENE F. W. DIEKSTRA The Prevention of Suicidal Behavior: Evidence for the Efficacy of Clinical and Community-based Programs Suicidal behaviors constitute a serious mental health problem. In many countries fatal suicide attempts rank. among the top 10 causes of death for people of all ages and among the 3 leading causes of death for those aged 15-39 years. In 1987, an estimated 130,000-150,000 per­ sons committed suicide in Europe alone. In addition, ten times as many people made a nonfatal suicide at­ tempt or deliberately hanned themselves seriously enough to require some sort of medical assistance. The actual number of people engaging in some form of deliberate self-hann is unknown, but is probably much greater because, in many cases, there is no contact with medical ser­ vices. In North America and Europe, 4% to 5% of persons aged 15 years or over have at some time attempted to commit suicide or to hann themselves deliberately. Given the magnitude of the problem, one might expect that develop­ ment, implementation, and evaluation of programs for intervention and prevention would have become an important public health priority. In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Mental Health Taylor & Francis

The Prevention of Suicidal Behavior: Evidence for the Efficacy of Clinical and Community-based Programs

International Journal of Mental Health , Volume 21 (3): 19 – Sep 1, 1992

The Prevention of Suicidal Behavior: Evidence for the Efficacy of Clinical and Community-based Programs

International Journal of Mental Health , Volume 21 (3): 19 – Sep 1, 1992

Abstract

Int. 1. Ment. Health, Vol. 21, No.3, pp. 69-87 M. E. Sharpe, Inc., 1992 RENE F. W. DIEKSTRA The Prevention of Suicidal Behavior: Evidence for the Efficacy of Clinical and Community-based Programs Suicidal behaviors constitute a serious mental health problem. In many countries fatal suicide attempts rank. among the top 10 causes of death for people of all ages and among the 3 leading causes of death for those aged 15-39 years. In 1987, an estimated 130,000-150,000 per­ sons committed suicide in Europe alone. In addition, ten times as many people made a nonfatal suicide at­ tempt or deliberately hanned themselves seriously enough to require some sort of medical assistance. The actual number of people engaging in some form of deliberate self-hann is unknown, but is probably much greater because, in many cases, there is no contact with medical ser­ vices. In North America and Europe, 4% to 5% of persons aged 15 years or over have at some time attempted to commit suicide or to hann themselves deliberately. Given the magnitude of the problem, one might expect that develop­ ment, implementation, and evaluation of programs for intervention and prevention would have become an important public health priority. In

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References (13)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1992 M. E. Sharpe Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1557-9328
eISSN
0020-7411
DOI
10.1080/00207411.1992.11449233
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Int. 1. Ment. Health, Vol. 21, No.3, pp. 69-87 M. E. Sharpe, Inc., 1992 RENE F. W. DIEKSTRA The Prevention of Suicidal Behavior: Evidence for the Efficacy of Clinical and Community-based Programs Suicidal behaviors constitute a serious mental health problem. In many countries fatal suicide attempts rank. among the top 10 causes of death for people of all ages and among the 3 leading causes of death for those aged 15-39 years. In 1987, an estimated 130,000-150,000 per­ sons committed suicide in Europe alone. In addition, ten times as many people made a nonfatal suicide at­ tempt or deliberately hanned themselves seriously enough to require some sort of medical assistance. The actual number of people engaging in some form of deliberate self-hann is unknown, but is probably much greater because, in many cases, there is no contact with medical ser­ vices. In North America and Europe, 4% to 5% of persons aged 15 years or over have at some time attempted to commit suicide or to hann themselves deliberately. Given the magnitude of the problem, one might expect that develop­ ment, implementation, and evaluation of programs for intervention and prevention would have become an important public health priority. In

Journal

International Journal of Mental HealthTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1992

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