Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Rescue of William D'Oyly: Colonial Castaway Encounters and the Imperial Gaze

The Rescue of William D'Oyly: Colonial Castaway Encounters and the Imperial Gaze Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art, 2023, vol. 23, no. 1, 96–110 https://doi.org/10.1080/14434318.2023.2212005 The Rescue of William D'Oyly: Colonial Castaway Encounters and the Imperial Gaze Lisa Chandler Art and Design, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs Castaways and Cross-Cultural Interactions Prominent British maritime artist John Wilson Carmichael’s (1799–1868) two paint- ings, The Rescue of William D’Oyly, by the Isabella, from Murray Island, Torres Strait, 1836 (1839, fig. 1), and The Rescue of William D’Oyly (1841, fig. 2), depict a dramatic and once widely known episode in colonial Australian history. In 1834, whilst en route from Sydney to India, the barque Charles Eaton was destroyed in rough seas on a reef near the eastern tip of Cape York in northern Australia. It was unknown if there were survivors, although contradictory reports suggested that there might yet be hope. Almost two years later, in June 1836, the Government Schooner Isabella arrived at Mer (Murray Island) where Captain Lewis and his crew found two of the survivors, William D’Oyly (aged four) and John Ireland (aged seven- teen), who were living with the Meriam people. Struggling to recall English, Ireland related his memories of events that ensued following the Charles Eaton’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art Taylor & Francis

The Rescue of William D'Oyly: Colonial Castaway Encounters and the Imperial Gaze

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art , Volume 23 (1): 15 – Jan 2, 2023
15 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/the-rescue-of-william-d-apos-oyly-colonial-castaway-encounters-and-the-JJB92tVKD4

References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
ISSN
2203-1871
eISSN
1443-4318
DOI
10.1080/14434318.2023.2212005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art, 2023, vol. 23, no. 1, 96–110 https://doi.org/10.1080/14434318.2023.2212005 The Rescue of William D'Oyly: Colonial Castaway Encounters and the Imperial Gaze Lisa Chandler Art and Design, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs Castaways and Cross-Cultural Interactions Prominent British maritime artist John Wilson Carmichael’s (1799–1868) two paint- ings, The Rescue of William D’Oyly, by the Isabella, from Murray Island, Torres Strait, 1836 (1839, fig. 1), and The Rescue of William D’Oyly (1841, fig. 2), depict a dramatic and once widely known episode in colonial Australian history. In 1834, whilst en route from Sydney to India, the barque Charles Eaton was destroyed in rough seas on a reef near the eastern tip of Cape York in northern Australia. It was unknown if there were survivors, although contradictory reports suggested that there might yet be hope. Almost two years later, in June 1836, the Government Schooner Isabella arrived at Mer (Murray Island) where Captain Lewis and his crew found two of the survivors, William D’Oyly (aged four) and John Ireland (aged seven- teen), who were living with the Meriam people. Struggling to recall English, Ireland related his memories of events that ensued following the Charles Eaton’s

Journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of ArtTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2023

There are no references for this article.