Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The ruse of consent and the anatomy of ‘refusal’: cases from indigenous North America and Australia

The ruse of consent and the anatomy of ‘refusal’: cases from indigenous North America and Australia This article takes the notion of ‘refusal’ to be an alternative to recognition politics in settler colonial society. This is argued as alternative with recourse to ethnographic examples that highlight the way in which ‘consent’ operates as a technique of recognition and simultaneous dispossession in historical cases from Indigenous North America and Australia. Attention is paid to the ways in which Indigenous life in these cases refused, did not consent to, and still refuses to be folded into a larger encompassing colonising and settler colonial narratives of acceptance, and in this, a governmental fait accompli. It is those narratives that inform the apprehension and at times, the ethnography and governance of Indigenous life and are pushed back upon in order to document, reread, theorise and enact ways out of the notion of a fixed past and settled present. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Postcolonial Studies Taylor & Francis

The ruse of consent and the anatomy of ‘refusal’: cases from indigenous North America and Australia

Postcolonial Studies , Volume 20 (1): 16 – Jan 2, 2017

The ruse of consent and the anatomy of ‘refusal’: cases from indigenous North America and Australia

Postcolonial Studies , Volume 20 (1): 16 – Jan 2, 2017

Abstract

This article takes the notion of ‘refusal’ to be an alternative to recognition politics in settler colonial society. This is argued as alternative with recourse to ethnographic examples that highlight the way in which ‘consent’ operates as a technique of recognition and simultaneous dispossession in historical cases from Indigenous North America and Australia. Attention is paid to the ways in which Indigenous life in these cases refused, did not consent to, and still refuses to be folded into a larger encompassing colonising and settler colonial narratives of acceptance, and in this, a governmental fait accompli. It is those narratives that inform the apprehension and at times, the ethnography and governance of Indigenous life and are pushed back upon in order to document, reread, theorise and enact ways out of the notion of a fixed past and settled present.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/the-ruse-of-consent-and-the-anatomy-of-refusal-cases-from-indigenous-kQBZtYABDN

References (36)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 The Institute of Postcolonial Studies
ISSN
1466-1888
eISSN
1368-8790
DOI
10.1080/13688790.2017.1334283
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article takes the notion of ‘refusal’ to be an alternative to recognition politics in settler colonial society. This is argued as alternative with recourse to ethnographic examples that highlight the way in which ‘consent’ operates as a technique of recognition and simultaneous dispossession in historical cases from Indigenous North America and Australia. Attention is paid to the ways in which Indigenous life in these cases refused, did not consent to, and still refuses to be folded into a larger encompassing colonising and settler colonial narratives of acceptance, and in this, a governmental fait accompli. It is those narratives that inform the apprehension and at times, the ethnography and governance of Indigenous life and are pushed back upon in order to document, reread, theorise and enact ways out of the notion of a fixed past and settled present.

Journal

Postcolonial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2017

Keywords: indigeneity; ethnography; consent; refusal

There are no references for this article.