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The TEACH Act and Library Services

The TEACH Act and Library Services Janet Croft KEYWORDS. Reserves, distance education, copyright, TEACH Act The Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act, passed late in 2002, is designed to “. . . redefine the terms and conditions on which accredited, nonprofit educational institutions throughout the U.S. may use copyright protected materials in distance education.” While the new law makes it easier to include copyrighted materials in distance education presentations, there are still a number of require- ments that must be met. How does TEACH affect electronic reserves in libraries? Actually, li- brary services are not explicitly mentioned in the TEACH Act at all. The TEACH Act applies only to materials an instructor might use in lesson content, not supplementary materials: “. . . the TEACH Act covers only works an instructor would show or play during class such as movie or music clips, images of artworks in an art history class, or a poetry reading. It does not cover materials an instructor may want students to study, read, listen to or watch on their own time outside of class.” Materials such as coursepacks, outside readings posted on courseware systems, and library electronic or physical reserves still fall under the fair use parameters in place since http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal Of Access Services Taylor & Francis

The TEACH Act and Library Services

Journal Of Access Services , Volume 1 (3): 2 – Jun 1, 2003

The TEACH Act and Library Services

Journal Of Access Services , Volume 1 (3): 2 – Jun 1, 2003

Abstract

Janet Croft KEYWORDS. Reserves, distance education, copyright, TEACH Act The Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act, passed late in 2002, is designed to “. . . redefine the terms and conditions on which accredited, nonprofit educational institutions throughout the U.S. may use copyright protected materials in distance education.” While the new law makes it easier to include copyrighted materials in distance education presentations, there are still a number of require- ments that must be met. How does TEACH affect electronic reserves in libraries? Actually, li- brary services are not explicitly mentioned in the TEACH Act at all. The TEACH Act applies only to materials an instructor might use in lesson content, not supplementary materials: “. . . the TEACH Act covers only works an instructor would show or play during class such as movie or music clips, images of artworks in an art history class, or a poetry reading. It does not cover materials an instructor may want students to study, read, listen to or watch on their own time outside of class.” Materials such as coursepacks, outside readings posted on courseware systems, and library electronic or physical reserves still fall under the fair use parameters in place since

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1536-7975
eISSN
1536-7967
DOI
10.1300/J204v01n03_02
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Janet Croft KEYWORDS. Reserves, distance education, copyright, TEACH Act The Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act, passed late in 2002, is designed to “. . . redefine the terms and conditions on which accredited, nonprofit educational institutions throughout the U.S. may use copyright protected materials in distance education.” While the new law makes it easier to include copyrighted materials in distance education presentations, there are still a number of require- ments that must be met. How does TEACH affect electronic reserves in libraries? Actually, li- brary services are not explicitly mentioned in the TEACH Act at all. The TEACH Act applies only to materials an instructor might use in lesson content, not supplementary materials: “. . . the TEACH Act covers only works an instructor would show or play during class such as movie or music clips, images of artworks in an art history class, or a poetry reading. It does not cover materials an instructor may want students to study, read, listen to or watch on their own time outside of class.” Materials such as coursepacks, outside readings posted on courseware systems, and library electronic or physical reserves still fall under the fair use parameters in place since

Journal

Journal Of Access ServicesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2003

Keywords: Reserves; distance education; copyright; TEACH Act

There are no references for this article.