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The United Nations and Civil Society: A Symposium on the Cardoso Report1

The United Nations and Civil Society: A Symposium on the Cardoso Report1 Journal of Civil Society Vol. 4, No. 2, 149 – 151, September 2008 COMMENTARY The United Nations and Civil Society: A Symposium on the Cardoso Report HELMUT K. ANHEIER UCLA School of Public Affairs, USA Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and international organizations share a long history, reaching back to the peace conferences of pre-WWI era and the League of Nations to the founding period of the United Nations (UN). Since the 1990s, NGOs have become more important in a number of UN responsibilities and concerns, including huma- nitarian assistance, democracy, economic development, or peace keeping. In 2002, then UN Secretary General Kofi Annan proposed a Panel of Eminent Persons on UN–civil society relations as part of a broad set of reform measures. The Panel was to consider UN–NGO relations not only with international NGOs but also with other civil society actors ‘on the ground’ at national levels—taken to include parliamentarians, citizen groups, and think- tanks. The Panel issued its report in 2004, commonly referred to as the Cardoso Report after its Chairman, Professor Enrico Cardoso, a former President of Brazil. The Report made 30 proposals and suggested many detailed changes to encourage ‘multi-constituency dialogues,’ new forums, networks, and partnership for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Civil Society Taylor & Francis

The United Nations and Civil Society: A Symposium on the Cardoso Report1

Journal of Civil Society , Volume 4 (2): 3 – Sep 1, 2008
3 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1744-8697
eISSN
1744-8689
DOI
10.1080/17448680802335193
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Civil Society Vol. 4, No. 2, 149 – 151, September 2008 COMMENTARY The United Nations and Civil Society: A Symposium on the Cardoso Report HELMUT K. ANHEIER UCLA School of Public Affairs, USA Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and international organizations share a long history, reaching back to the peace conferences of pre-WWI era and the League of Nations to the founding period of the United Nations (UN). Since the 1990s, NGOs have become more important in a number of UN responsibilities and concerns, including huma- nitarian assistance, democracy, economic development, or peace keeping. In 2002, then UN Secretary General Kofi Annan proposed a Panel of Eminent Persons on UN–civil society relations as part of a broad set of reform measures. The Panel was to consider UN–NGO relations not only with international NGOs but also with other civil society actors ‘on the ground’ at national levels—taken to include parliamentarians, citizen groups, and think- tanks. The Panel issued its report in 2004, commonly referred to as the Cardoso Report after its Chairman, Professor Enrico Cardoso, a former President of Brazil. The Report made 30 proposals and suggested many detailed changes to encourage ‘multi-constituency dialogues,’ new forums, networks, and partnership for

Journal

Journal of Civil SocietyTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2008

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