Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Time to interrogate corporate interests in public health?

Time to interrogate corporate interests in public health? CRITICAL PUBLIC HEALTH 2019, VOL. 29, NO. 3, 257–259 https://doi.org/10.1080/09581596.2019.1587886 EDITORIAL A healthy population is a public good, and in most countries, there is a consensus that it is in everybody’s interests that services such as vaccinations, environmental health inspectors, sexual health provision, health promotion, or emergency planning are funded through taxation. There is, broadly, a trust in public bodies to act in ways that protect the health of the public. However, this is potentially undermined by the increasingly ‘mixed economy’ of public health provision (Garnett, Baeza, Trenholm, Gulliford, & Green, 2018). Public health has increasingly become the business of big (and small) business. Corporate interests in public health are diverse. Some are straightforwardly utilitarian. A healthy workforce is an efficient workforce, and it is no surprise to find growing investments in corporate well-being programmes, or in workplace health insurance linked to healthy lifestyles. Other industries create positive public health effects as a by-product of unrelated profit-maximisation strategies. Car insurers, for instance, increasingly use telematic technologies (‘black boxes’) so they can open up markets for young drivers. These maximise efficient management of insurance risks, and potentially generate data that can be profitably sold on, but also potentially create a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Critical Public Health Taylor & Francis

Time to interrogate corporate interests in public health?

Critical Public Health , Volume 29 (3): 3 – May 27, 2019

Time to interrogate corporate interests in public health?

Critical Public Health , Volume 29 (3): 3 – May 27, 2019

Abstract

CRITICAL PUBLIC HEALTH 2019, VOL. 29, NO. 3, 257–259 https://doi.org/10.1080/09581596.2019.1587886 EDITORIAL A healthy population is a public good, and in most countries, there is a consensus that it is in everybody’s interests that services such as vaccinations, environmental health inspectors, sexual health provision, health promotion, or emergency planning are funded through taxation. There is, broadly, a trust in public bodies to act in ways that protect the health of the public. However, this is potentially undermined by the increasingly ‘mixed economy’ of public health provision (Garnett, Baeza, Trenholm, Gulliford, & Green, 2018). Public health has increasingly become the business of big (and small) business. Corporate interests in public health are diverse. Some are straightforwardly utilitarian. A healthy workforce is an efficient workforce, and it is no surprise to find growing investments in corporate well-being programmes, or in workplace health insurance linked to healthy lifestyles. Other industries create positive public health effects as a by-product of unrelated profit-maximisation strategies. Car insurers, for instance, increasingly use telematic technologies (‘black boxes’) so they can open up markets for young drivers. These maximise efficient management of insurance risks, and potentially generate data that can be profitably sold on, but also potentially create a

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/time-to-interrogate-corporate-interests-in-public-health-9s6CP1tVll

References (9)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1469-3682
eISSN
0958-1596
DOI
10.1080/09581596.2019.1587886
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CRITICAL PUBLIC HEALTH 2019, VOL. 29, NO. 3, 257–259 https://doi.org/10.1080/09581596.2019.1587886 EDITORIAL A healthy population is a public good, and in most countries, there is a consensus that it is in everybody’s interests that services such as vaccinations, environmental health inspectors, sexual health provision, health promotion, or emergency planning are funded through taxation. There is, broadly, a trust in public bodies to act in ways that protect the health of the public. However, this is potentially undermined by the increasingly ‘mixed economy’ of public health provision (Garnett, Baeza, Trenholm, Gulliford, & Green, 2018). Public health has increasingly become the business of big (and small) business. Corporate interests in public health are diverse. Some are straightforwardly utilitarian. A healthy workforce is an efficient workforce, and it is no surprise to find growing investments in corporate well-being programmes, or in workplace health insurance linked to healthy lifestyles. Other industries create positive public health effects as a by-product of unrelated profit-maximisation strategies. Car insurers, for instance, increasingly use telematic technologies (‘black boxes’) so they can open up markets for young drivers. These maximise efficient management of insurance risks, and potentially generate data that can be profitably sold on, but also potentially create a

Journal

Critical Public HealthTaylor & Francis

Published: May 27, 2019

There are no references for this article.