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Tourism, Nationalism and Post-Communist Romania: The Life and Death of Dracula Park

Tourism, Nationalism and Post-Communist Romania: The Life and Death of Dracula Park The following analysis examines how Romania is responding to Dracula as a tourist attraction and focuses on the debate surrounding the proposed development of Dracula Park. The theme park employed a mythology developed from Bram Stoker's popularised Count Dracula, a character loosely based on medieval Wallachian ruler Vlad Tepes. The proposal triggered a string of heated debates that eventually thwarted the project. Although Dracula Park was met with opposition in Romania and from abroad, tourism (mainly from the western European Union and north American countries) to ‘Dracula sites’ continues and local tourism industries are thriving. This paper will contextualise this situation in longstanding debates on national identity and attempts to redefine Romania after Communism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change Taylor & Francis

Tourism, Nationalism and Post-Communist Romania: The Life and Death of Dracula Park

Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change , Volume 4 (3): 18 – Dec 1, 2006
18 pages

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References (68)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1747-7654
eISSN
1476-6825
DOI
10.2167/jtcc070.0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The following analysis examines how Romania is responding to Dracula as a tourist attraction and focuses on the debate surrounding the proposed development of Dracula Park. The theme park employed a mythology developed from Bram Stoker's popularised Count Dracula, a character loosely based on medieval Wallachian ruler Vlad Tepes. The proposal triggered a string of heated debates that eventually thwarted the project. Although Dracula Park was met with opposition in Romania and from abroad, tourism (mainly from the western European Union and north American countries) to ‘Dracula sites’ continues and local tourism industries are thriving. This paper will contextualise this situation in longstanding debates on national identity and attempts to redefine Romania after Communism.

Journal

Journal of Tourism and Cultural ChangeTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2006

Keywords: tourism; nationalism; globalisation; post-Communism; Romania

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