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TRACE ELEMENT CONTENT OF SELECTED FERTILIZERS AND DAIRY MANURES AS DETERMINED BY ICP–MS

TRACE ELEMENT CONTENT OF SELECTED FERTILIZERS AND DAIRY MANURES AS DETERMINED BY ICP–MS The trace element composition of representative fertilizers, liming agents, and dairy manures applied on farms in New York was measured because there has been recent concern about toxic metal contaminants in fertilizers and other soil amendments used in agriculture. Selected commercial fertilizers, lime products, and dairy manures were sampled, digested with hydrofluoric acid mixtures, and analyzed for trace element contaminants by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP–MS). The trace element and heavy metal concentrations of the commercial fertilizers tested were generally low, although the phosphate component of fertilizer blends contained measurable concentrations of several elements of concern, including cadmium (Cd), uranium (U), arsenic (As), and molybdenum (Mo). At the concentrations in these fertilizers, agronomic rates of application would take decades to significantly increase soil concentrations of these elements above background. The manures were found on average to have low concentrations of all trace elements and heavy metals measured, with the important exceptions of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), where feed additives and use of Cu sulfate in treating hoof rot may explain the highest concentrations measured. Annual loadings of about 0.35 kg ha−1 Cu and 0.9 kg ha−1 Zn to dairy farmland are estimated for the median manure composition. Concentrations of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) did not exceed 4.3, 0.4, and 0.05 mg kg−1 (dry weight), respectively, in any manure sample. Correlation of manure Pb concentration to aluminum (Al), indicates that soil contamination of the manure accounts for most of the Pb. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis Taylor & Francis

TRACE ELEMENT CONTENT OF SELECTED FERTILIZERS AND DAIRY MANURES AS DETERMINED BY ICP–MS

TRACE ELEMENT CONTENT OF SELECTED FERTILIZERS AND DAIRY MANURES AS DETERMINED BY ICP–MS

Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis , Volume 32 (1-2): 18 – Feb 28, 2001

Abstract

The trace element composition of representative fertilizers, liming agents, and dairy manures applied on farms in New York was measured because there has been recent concern about toxic metal contaminants in fertilizers and other soil amendments used in agriculture. Selected commercial fertilizers, lime products, and dairy manures were sampled, digested with hydrofluoric acid mixtures, and analyzed for trace element contaminants by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP–MS). The trace element and heavy metal concentrations of the commercial fertilizers tested were generally low, although the phosphate component of fertilizer blends contained measurable concentrations of several elements of concern, including cadmium (Cd), uranium (U), arsenic (As), and molybdenum (Mo). At the concentrations in these fertilizers, agronomic rates of application would take decades to significantly increase soil concentrations of these elements above background. The manures were found on average to have low concentrations of all trace elements and heavy metals measured, with the important exceptions of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), where feed additives and use of Cu sulfate in treating hoof rot may explain the highest concentrations measured. Annual loadings of about 0.35 kg ha−1 Cu and 0.9 kg ha−1 Zn to dairy farmland are estimated for the median manure composition. Concentrations of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) did not exceed 4.3, 0.4, and 0.05 mg kg−1 (dry weight), respectively, in any manure sample. Correlation of manure Pb concentration to aluminum (Al), indicates that soil contamination of the manure accounts for most of the Pb.

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References (26)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-2416
eISSN
0010-3624
DOI
10.1081/CSS-100102999
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The trace element composition of representative fertilizers, liming agents, and dairy manures applied on farms in New York was measured because there has been recent concern about toxic metal contaminants in fertilizers and other soil amendments used in agriculture. Selected commercial fertilizers, lime products, and dairy manures were sampled, digested with hydrofluoric acid mixtures, and analyzed for trace element contaminants by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP–MS). The trace element and heavy metal concentrations of the commercial fertilizers tested were generally low, although the phosphate component of fertilizer blends contained measurable concentrations of several elements of concern, including cadmium (Cd), uranium (U), arsenic (As), and molybdenum (Mo). At the concentrations in these fertilizers, agronomic rates of application would take decades to significantly increase soil concentrations of these elements above background. The manures were found on average to have low concentrations of all trace elements and heavy metals measured, with the important exceptions of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), where feed additives and use of Cu sulfate in treating hoof rot may explain the highest concentrations measured. Annual loadings of about 0.35 kg ha−1 Cu and 0.9 kg ha−1 Zn to dairy farmland are estimated for the median manure composition. Concentrations of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) did not exceed 4.3, 0.4, and 0.05 mg kg−1 (dry weight), respectively, in any manure sample. Correlation of manure Pb concentration to aluminum (Al), indicates that soil contamination of the manure accounts for most of the Pb.

Journal

Communications in Soil Science and Plant AnalysisTaylor & Francis

Published: Feb 28, 2001

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