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Tradition loss as secondary disaster: Long‐term cultural impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill

Tradition loss as secondary disaster: Long‐term cultural impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill This article presents a qualitative analysis of the cultural impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill of March 24, 1989. The focus of the article is on Alaska Natives in Cordova, Alaska. The analysis uses a conceptual framework contrasting community worldviews of the Dominant Social Paradigm (DSP) and the Natural Resource Community (NRC). Data reveal incipient cultural impacts from the spill that can evolve into tradition loss. These include decline of sharing and social support networks, decline in subsistence activities, and disruption of communal control of local natural resources. It is recommended that proactive incorporation of culturally appropriate responses to disasters become a priority of multinational corporations and their regulatory agencies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociological Spectrum Taylor & Francis

Tradition loss as secondary disaster: Long‐term cultural impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill

Sociological Spectrum , Volume 13 (1): 24 – Jan 1, 1993

Tradition loss as secondary disaster: Long‐term cultural impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill

Sociological Spectrum , Volume 13 (1): 24 – Jan 1, 1993

Abstract

This article presents a qualitative analysis of the cultural impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill of March 24, 1989. The focus of the article is on Alaska Natives in Cordova, Alaska. The analysis uses a conceptual framework contrasting community worldviews of the Dominant Social Paradigm (DSP) and the Natural Resource Community (NRC). Data reveal incipient cultural impacts from the spill that can evolve into tradition loss. These include decline of sharing and social support networks, decline in subsistence activities, and disruption of communal control of local natural resources. It is recommended that proactive incorporation of culturally appropriate responses to disasters become a priority of multinational corporations and their regulatory agencies.

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References (31)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1521-0707
eISSN
0273-2173
DOI
10.1080/02732173.1993.9982017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article presents a qualitative analysis of the cultural impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill of March 24, 1989. The focus of the article is on Alaska Natives in Cordova, Alaska. The analysis uses a conceptual framework contrasting community worldviews of the Dominant Social Paradigm (DSP) and the Natural Resource Community (NRC). Data reveal incipient cultural impacts from the spill that can evolve into tradition loss. These include decline of sharing and social support networks, decline in subsistence activities, and disruption of communal control of local natural resources. It is recommended that proactive incorporation of culturally appropriate responses to disasters become a priority of multinational corporations and their regulatory agencies.

Journal

Sociological SpectrumTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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