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Turkey's Role in Defusing the Iranian Nuclear Issue

Turkey's Role in Defusing the Iranian Nuclear Issue Aylin Gu ¨rzel Turkey’s Role in Defusing the Iranian Nuclear Issue In May 2010, while the United States and other Western powers in the UN Security Council were drafting a resolution on further sanctions to pressure Iran over its controversial nuclear program, Turkey and Brazilthen non-permanent members of the Security Councilannounced a fuel-swap deal with Iran. The Tehran Declaration, as it was called, stipulated that 20-percent-enriched nuclear fuel was to be provided to Iran for its use in the Tehran Research Reactor, which produces medical isotopes, in exchange for the removal of 1,200 kilograms of 3.5-percent-low-enriched uranium (LEU) to Turkey. Initial reactions to the deal varied, but there was fear that the 20-percent-enriched fuel would enable Iran to further enrich uranium and attain the level necessary to construct a nuclear weapon more rapidly. Turkey and Iran had been discussing a deal for nearly eight months, since U.S. President Barack Obama sent a similar proposal to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdog ˘an in October 2009. Iranian officials initially stalled, not wanting to give up their uranium; however, when they received intelligence that China and Russia (sometime Iranian allies) were in accord with the UN sanctions, Iran reluctantly agreed to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Washington Quarterly Taylor & Francis

Turkey's Role in Defusing the Iranian Nuclear Issue

The Washington Quarterly , Volume 35 (3): 12 – Aug 1, 2012

Turkey's Role in Defusing the Iranian Nuclear Issue

The Washington Quarterly , Volume 35 (3): 12 – Aug 1, 2012

Abstract

Aylin Gu ¨rzel Turkey’s Role in Defusing the Iranian Nuclear Issue In May 2010, while the United States and other Western powers in the UN Security Council were drafting a resolution on further sanctions to pressure Iran over its controversial nuclear program, Turkey and Brazilthen non-permanent members of the Security Councilannounced a fuel-swap deal with Iran. The Tehran Declaration, as it was called, stipulated that 20-percent-enriched nuclear fuel was to be provided to Iran for its use in the Tehran Research Reactor, which produces medical isotopes, in exchange for the removal of 1,200 kilograms of 3.5-percent-low-enriched uranium (LEU) to Turkey. Initial reactions to the deal varied, but there was fear that the 20-percent-enriched fuel would enable Iran to further enrich uranium and attain the level necessary to construct a nuclear weapon more rapidly. Turkey and Iran had been discussing a deal for nearly eight months, since U.S. President Barack Obama sent a similar proposal to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdog ˘an in October 2009. Iranian officials initially stalled, not wanting to give up their uranium; however, when they received intelligence that China and Russia (sometime Iranian allies) were in accord with the UN sanctions, Iran reluctantly agreed to

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References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Center for Strategic and International Studies
ISSN
1530-9177
eISSN
0163-660X
DOI
10.1080/0163660X.2012.706576
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aylin Gu ¨rzel Turkey’s Role in Defusing the Iranian Nuclear Issue In May 2010, while the United States and other Western powers in the UN Security Council were drafting a resolution on further sanctions to pressure Iran over its controversial nuclear program, Turkey and Brazilthen non-permanent members of the Security Councilannounced a fuel-swap deal with Iran. The Tehran Declaration, as it was called, stipulated that 20-percent-enriched nuclear fuel was to be provided to Iran for its use in the Tehran Research Reactor, which produces medical isotopes, in exchange for the removal of 1,200 kilograms of 3.5-percent-low-enriched uranium (LEU) to Turkey. Initial reactions to the deal varied, but there was fear that the 20-percent-enriched fuel would enable Iran to further enrich uranium and attain the level necessary to construct a nuclear weapon more rapidly. Turkey and Iran had been discussing a deal for nearly eight months, since U.S. President Barack Obama sent a similar proposal to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdog ˘an in October 2009. Iranian officials initially stalled, not wanting to give up their uranium; however, when they received intelligence that China and Russia (sometime Iranian allies) were in accord with the UN sanctions, Iran reluctantly agreed to

Journal

The Washington QuarterlyTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 1, 2012

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