Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Using Grounded Theory to Explore Stakeholder Perceptions of Tourism

Using Grounded Theory to Explore Stakeholder Perceptions of Tourism This paper explores the application of grounded theory as a tool for building theory on the relationship between stakeholder analysis, perceptions of tourism induced change and sustainable tourism. An inductive research process, grounded theory is appropriate for situations where no pre-existing theory exists, yet has rarely been used by tourism researchers. This study established that little theory existed regarding the role of stakeholder analysis in facilitating sustainable tourism, therefore grounded theory was an appropriate methodological tool. Using the study area of the Daintree area of far north Queensland, Australia, grounded theory was applied through several iterations of data collection. The outcomes of the grounded theory approach were twofold. Firstly, recommendations specifically applicable to the region were made, which were related to the effects that tourism had on the local community and the culture of tourism in the region. These included a need to increase understanding of the variety of stakeholder perceptions within the region (including visitors), and a need for regulators to incorporate them into management strategies. Secondly, substantive theoretical propositions were induced from the findings. These illustrated the relevance of stakeholder analysis in facilitating sustainable tourism, particularly given its ability to track the effects of tourism when applied longitudinally. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change Taylor & Francis

Using Grounded Theory to Explore Stakeholder Perceptions of Tourism

Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change , Volume 3 (2): 26 – Oct 1, 2005
26 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/using-grounded-theory-to-explore-stakeholder-perceptions-of-tourism-35q4tfyd2e

References (75)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1747-7654
eISSN
1476-6825
DOI
10.1080/09669580508668490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper explores the application of grounded theory as a tool for building theory on the relationship between stakeholder analysis, perceptions of tourism induced change and sustainable tourism. An inductive research process, grounded theory is appropriate for situations where no pre-existing theory exists, yet has rarely been used by tourism researchers. This study established that little theory existed regarding the role of stakeholder analysis in facilitating sustainable tourism, therefore grounded theory was an appropriate methodological tool. Using the study area of the Daintree area of far north Queensland, Australia, grounded theory was applied through several iterations of data collection. The outcomes of the grounded theory approach were twofold. Firstly, recommendations specifically applicable to the region were made, which were related to the effects that tourism had on the local community and the culture of tourism in the region. These included a need to increase understanding of the variety of stakeholder perceptions within the region (including visitors), and a need for regulators to incorporate them into management strategies. Secondly, substantive theoretical propositions were induced from the findings. These illustrated the relevance of stakeholder analysis in facilitating sustainable tourism, particularly given its ability to track the effects of tourism when applied longitudinally.

Journal

Journal of Tourism and Cultural ChangeTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2005

Keywords: Daintree; grounded theory; stakeholder perceptions; sustainable tourism

There are no references for this article.