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Variables Affecting the Relationship between Depression and Attribution of Outcomes

Variables Affecting the Relationship between Depression and Attribution of Outcomes The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 1983, 142, 293-300. VARIABLES AFFECTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND ATTRIBUTION OF OUTCOMES* Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine WILLIAM C. HOUSE SUMMARY The current study investigated the influence of the interpersonal context on the relationship between depression and attribution of outcomes. Since attributions of success and failure are frequently considered to be influenced by self-serving biases, it was anticipated that Ss’ knowledge that their attributions would be observed by a peer in their presence would influence the relationship between depression and attribution. Male and female Ss (N = 229) passed or failed an identity-relevant or non-identity-relevant task. Half were told their attributions would be observed by a peer with whom they were paired in the experiment (observation condition) and half believed their attributions would only be seen anonymously at a later time by the E (nonobservation group). Results for Ss who performed the identity-relevant word task were supportive of the hypothesis that the relationship between depression and ability attributions is stronger under observation conditions than under nonobservation conditions. The findings were discussed in the context of an interactional viewpoint of depression. A. INTRODUCTION Within the past few years the relationship between depression http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Genetic Psychology Taylor & Francis

Variables Affecting the Relationship between Depression and Attribution of Outcomes

The Journal of Genetic Psychology , Volume 142 (2): 8 – Jun 1, 1983

Variables Affecting the Relationship between Depression and Attribution of Outcomes

The Journal of Genetic Psychology , Volume 142 (2): 8 – Jun 1, 1983

Abstract

The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 1983, 142, 293-300. VARIABLES AFFECTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND ATTRIBUTION OF OUTCOMES* Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine WILLIAM C. HOUSE SUMMARY The current study investigated the influence of the interpersonal context on the relationship between depression and attribution of outcomes. Since attributions of success and failure are frequently considered to be influenced by self-serving biases, it was anticipated that Ss’ knowledge that their attributions would be observed by a peer in their presence would influence the relationship between depression and attribution. Male and female Ss (N = 229) passed or failed an identity-relevant or non-identity-relevant task. Half were told their attributions would be observed by a peer with whom they were paired in the experiment (observation condition) and half believed their attributions would only be seen anonymously at a later time by the E (nonobservation group). Results for Ss who performed the identity-relevant word task were supportive of the hypothesis that the relationship between depression and ability attributions is stronger under observation conditions than under nonobservation conditions. The findings were discussed in the context of an interactional viewpoint of depression. A. INTRODUCTION Within the past few years the relationship between depression

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References (7)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1940-0896
eISSN
0022-1325
DOI
10.1080/00221325.1983.10533520
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 1983, 142, 293-300. VARIABLES AFFECTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND ATTRIBUTION OF OUTCOMES* Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine WILLIAM C. HOUSE SUMMARY The current study investigated the influence of the interpersonal context on the relationship between depression and attribution of outcomes. Since attributions of success and failure are frequently considered to be influenced by self-serving biases, it was anticipated that Ss’ knowledge that their attributions would be observed by a peer in their presence would influence the relationship between depression and attribution. Male and female Ss (N = 229) passed or failed an identity-relevant or non-identity-relevant task. Half were told their attributions would be observed by a peer with whom they were paired in the experiment (observation condition) and half believed their attributions would only be seen anonymously at a later time by the E (nonobservation group). Results for Ss who performed the identity-relevant word task were supportive of the hypothesis that the relationship between depression and ability attributions is stronger under observation conditions than under nonobservation conditions. The findings were discussed in the context of an interactional viewpoint of depression. A. INTRODUCTION Within the past few years the relationship between depression

Journal

The Journal of Genetic PsychologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 1983

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