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Viable populations for conservation

Viable populations for conservation Abstract How many individuals are enough to ensure long term survival of a species? What are the effects of chance on demographic structure and genetic variability? How can we work together to ensure viable populations? These questions and others are explored in this excellent little book. It concentrates on theory, especially aspects of viability analysis, although there is a case study, and also examples of interagency activities. As in any book, readers can find passages that support their pre-existing views, but taken as a whole this one provides considerable balance. The editor admits that in places he is arguing for his personal preference. Other authors stress that many decisions in conservation biology rightly belong to the community and not just the scientists for whom this book is primarily intended. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand Taylor & Francis

Viable populations for conservation

Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand , Volume 20 (3): 3 – Sep 1, 1990

Viable populations for conservation

Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand , Volume 20 (3): 3 – Sep 1, 1990

Abstract

Abstract How many individuals are enough to ensure long term survival of a species? What are the effects of chance on demographic structure and genetic variability? How can we work together to ensure viable populations? These questions and others are explored in this excellent little book. It concentrates on theory, especially aspects of viability analysis, although there is a case study, and also examples of interagency activities. As in any book, readers can find passages that support their pre-existing views, but taken as a whole this one provides considerable balance. The editor admits that in places he is arguing for his personal preference. Other authors stress that many decisions in conservation biology rightly belong to the community and not just the scientists for whom this book is primarily intended.

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1175-8899
eISSN
0303-6758
DOI
10.1080/03036758.1990.10416827
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract How many individuals are enough to ensure long term survival of a species? What are the effects of chance on demographic structure and genetic variability? How can we work together to ensure viable populations? These questions and others are explored in this excellent little book. It concentrates on theory, especially aspects of viability analysis, although there is a case study, and also examples of interagency activities. As in any book, readers can find passages that support their pre-existing views, but taken as a whole this one provides considerable balance. The editor admits that in places he is arguing for his personal preference. Other authors stress that many decisions in conservation biology rightly belong to the community and not just the scientists for whom this book is primarily intended.

Journal

Journal of the Royal Society of New ZealandTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 1990

There are no references for this article.