Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Voluntary Associations and Social Mobility among West African Women

Voluntary Associations and Social Mobility among West African Women Canadian Journal of African Studies, VI, ii (1972), 275-288 La Revue Canadienne des Etudes Africaines Voluntary Associations and Social Mobility among West African Women KENNETH LITTLE * Any satisfactory analysis of the above topic must begin, for methodological rea­ sons, with the concept of urbanization. This is because many major changes occurring in West Africa can be most readily understood in terms of this process • In effect, a species of social as well as industrial revolution has come about which is most strikingly exemplified by the new roles opened to the younger men and to women in general. Previously, most women had to be content with a tradi­ tionally prescribed position ; the contemporary situation, however, is different and for many women achieved as well as ascribed forms of status are now available. Urbanization itself is of central importance in this matter because it is in the 'modern' town that most of the fresh opportunities occur. The over-all result is the appearance of an embryonic class system, based mainly on socio-economic differences. Ethnic and kinship ties and loyalties still have considerable signif­ icance ; but political position, occupation, income and education are, nowadays, all very relevant criteria in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian Journal of African Studies / La Revue Canadienne des etudes Africaines Taylor & Francis

Voluntary Associations and Social Mobility among West African Women

Voluntary Associations and Social Mobility among West African Women


Abstract

Canadian Journal of African Studies, VI, ii (1972), 275-288 La Revue Canadienne des Etudes Africaines Voluntary Associations and Social Mobility among West African Women KENNETH LITTLE * Any satisfactory analysis of the above topic must begin, for methodological rea­ sons, with the concept of urbanization. This is because many major changes occurring in West Africa can be most readily understood in terms of this process • In effect, a species of social as well as industrial revolution has come about which is most strikingly exemplified by the new roles opened to the younger men and to women in general. Previously, most women had to be content with a tradi­ tionally prescribed position ; the contemporary situation, however, is different and for many women achieved as well as ascribed forms of status are now available. Urbanization itself is of central importance in this matter because it is in the 'modern' town that most of the fresh opportunities occur. The over-all result is the appearance of an embryonic class system, based mainly on socio-economic differences. Ethnic and kinship ties and loyalties still have considerable signif­ icance ; but political position, occupation, income and education are, nowadays, all very relevant criteria in

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/voluntary-associations-and-social-mobility-among-west-african-women-axbqHPgQSc

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1972 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1923-3051
eISSN
0008-3968
DOI
10.1080/00083968.1972.10803671
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Canadian Journal of African Studies, VI, ii (1972), 275-288 La Revue Canadienne des Etudes Africaines Voluntary Associations and Social Mobility among West African Women KENNETH LITTLE * Any satisfactory analysis of the above topic must begin, for methodological rea­ sons, with the concept of urbanization. This is because many major changes occurring in West Africa can be most readily understood in terms of this process • In effect, a species of social as well as industrial revolution has come about which is most strikingly exemplified by the new roles opened to the younger men and to women in general. Previously, most women had to be content with a tradi­ tionally prescribed position ; the contemporary situation, however, is different and for many women achieved as well as ascribed forms of status are now available. Urbanization itself is of central importance in this matter because it is in the 'modern' town that most of the fresh opportunities occur. The over-all result is the appearance of an embryonic class system, based mainly on socio-economic differences. Ethnic and kinship ties and loyalties still have considerable signif­ icance ; but political position, occupation, income and education are, nowadays, all very relevant criteria in

Journal

Canadian Journal of African Studies / La Revue Canadienne des etudes AfricainesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1972

There are no references for this article.