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What's Outside the Black Box?: The Status of Behavioral Outcomes in Neuroscience Research

What's Outside the Black Box?: The Status of Behavioral Outcomes in Neuroscience Research Psychological Inquiry, 22: 100–107, 2011 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1047-840X print / 1532-7965 online DOI: 10.1080/1047840X.2011.550182 What’s Outside the Black Box?: The Status of Behavioral Outcomes in Neuroscience Research Elliot T. Berkman Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon Matthew D. Lieberman Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California Over the last several decades there have been mul- theoretical and methodological considerations relevant tiple shifts in the relative emphasis of mental pro- to behavior in light of psychometric modeling. cesses versus behavior in psychological science, par- ticularly in social psychology. Studies on one side of this behavior-mental process pendulum take be- Three Types of Data havioral measures (e.g., whether the participant will deliver shocks to another individual) as the primary Kievit et al. describe two classes of data: indicators outcome and view mental processes as occurring in of psychological or mental (P) processes, including an unobservable black box; studies on the other side paper-and-pencil assessments of stable individual dif- adopt mental processes (e.g., attitudes) as the primary ferences and performance on tasks thought to assess outcome and often do not assess relevant behaviors. mental processes, and indicators of neurological (N) From a broad http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Inquiry Taylor & Francis

What's Outside the Black Box?: The Status of Behavioral Outcomes in Neuroscience Research

Psychological Inquiry , Volume 22 (2): 8 – Apr 1, 2011

What's Outside the Black Box?: The Status of Behavioral Outcomes in Neuroscience Research

Psychological Inquiry , Volume 22 (2): 8 – Apr 1, 2011

Abstract

Psychological Inquiry, 22: 100–107, 2011 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1047-840X print / 1532-7965 online DOI: 10.1080/1047840X.2011.550182 What’s Outside the Black Box?: The Status of Behavioral Outcomes in Neuroscience Research Elliot T. Berkman Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon Matthew D. Lieberman Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California Over the last several decades there have been mul- theoretical and methodological considerations relevant tiple shifts in the relative emphasis of mental pro- to behavior in light of psychometric modeling. cesses versus behavior in psychological science, par- ticularly in social psychology. Studies on one side of this behavior-mental process pendulum take be- Three Types of Data havioral measures (e.g., whether the participant will deliver shocks to another individual) as the primary Kievit et al. describe two classes of data: indicators outcome and view mental processes as occurring in of psychological or mental (P) processes, including an unobservable black box; studies on the other side paper-and-pencil assessments of stable individual dif- adopt mental processes (e.g., attitudes) as the primary ferences and performance on tasks thought to assess outcome and often do not assess relevant behaviors. mental processes, and indicators of neurological (N) From a broad

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References (46)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-7965
eISSN
1047-840X
DOI
10.1080/1047840X.2011.550182
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Psychological Inquiry, 22: 100–107, 2011 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1047-840X print / 1532-7965 online DOI: 10.1080/1047840X.2011.550182 What’s Outside the Black Box?: The Status of Behavioral Outcomes in Neuroscience Research Elliot T. Berkman Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon Matthew D. Lieberman Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California Over the last several decades there have been mul- theoretical and methodological considerations relevant tiple shifts in the relative emphasis of mental pro- to behavior in light of psychometric modeling. cesses versus behavior in psychological science, par- ticularly in social psychology. Studies on one side of this behavior-mental process pendulum take be- Three Types of Data havioral measures (e.g., whether the participant will deliver shocks to another individual) as the primary Kievit et al. describe two classes of data: indicators outcome and view mental processes as occurring in of psychological or mental (P) processes, including an unobservable black box; studies on the other side paper-and-pencil assessments of stable individual dif- adopt mental processes (e.g., attitudes) as the primary ferences and performance on tasks thought to assess outcome and often do not assess relevant behaviors. mental processes, and indicators of neurological (N) From a broad

Journal

Psychological InquiryTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 2011

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