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What matters for life satisfaction in the oldest-old?

What matters for life satisfaction in the oldest-old? The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with life satisfaction in the oldest-old within a spectrum of psychosocial and health related variables. Scores on the life satisfaction index (LSI-Z) were related to scales and questions regarding, demographics, depression, locus of control, cognitive function, functional capacity (instrumental and personal activities of daily living), self-rated overall health and medically based health, and social network. The sample consisted of 315 participants, aged 80–98 years; (M = 83 years, 66% women). Regression analyses indicated that social network quality, self-rated overall health, sense of being in control of one's life, and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with life satisfaction. There was no gender difference in overall life satisfaction. However, there were different patterns of variables associated with life satisfaction in men and women. Self-rated overall health and depressive symptoms were related to life satisfaction in women, whereas widowhood was significantly associated with lower life satisfaction among men. The results emphasize the need to analyse associates of life satisfaction within a broader context of psychosocial variables and separately for men and women. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aging & Mental Health Taylor & Francis

What matters for life satisfaction in the oldest-old?

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References (62)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1364-6915
eISSN
1360-7863
DOI
10.1080/13607860500409435
pmid
16777653
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with life satisfaction in the oldest-old within a spectrum of psychosocial and health related variables. Scores on the life satisfaction index (LSI-Z) were related to scales and questions regarding, demographics, depression, locus of control, cognitive function, functional capacity (instrumental and personal activities of daily living), self-rated overall health and medically based health, and social network. The sample consisted of 315 participants, aged 80–98 years; (M = 83 years, 66% women). Regression analyses indicated that social network quality, self-rated overall health, sense of being in control of one's life, and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with life satisfaction. There was no gender difference in overall life satisfaction. However, there were different patterns of variables associated with life satisfaction in men and women. Self-rated overall health and depressive symptoms were related to life satisfaction in women, whereas widowhood was significantly associated with lower life satisfaction among men. The results emphasize the need to analyse associates of life satisfaction within a broader context of psychosocial variables and separately for men and women.

Journal

Aging & Mental HealthTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 2006

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