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What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets

What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets Social and Environmental Accountability Journal, 2013 Vol. 33, No. 3, 185 – 188 Book Reviews What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets Michael Sandel London: Allen Lane, 2012, 256 pp., £20.00, ISBN-10 184614471X In What Money Can’t Buy, Sandel argues that there has been a shift, over the last 30 years, from a market economy to what he refers to as a market society – where almost ‘everything is up for sale’ (p. 8). According to Sandel, the ubiquitous presence of markets in our everyday life demands scrutiny and the role of markets in a democratic society debated. It is the aim of the book to open up the debate by asking, ‘what role should markets play in public life and personal relations? How can we decide which goods should be bought and sold, and which should be gov- erned by non-market values?’ (p. 11). The book is crammed full of examples of the intrusion of market values into spheres of life which were formally governed by non-market values. These examples include: the use of private military contractors (where Sandel notes that in Iraq and Afghanistan, private military contractors outnumbered US troops); offering drug-addicted women $300 to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social and Environmental Accountability Journal Taylor & Francis

What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets

What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets

Social and Environmental Accountability Journal , Volume 33 (3): 2 – Dec 1, 2013

Abstract

Social and Environmental Accountability Journal, 2013 Vol. 33, No. 3, 185 – 188 Book Reviews What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets Michael Sandel London: Allen Lane, 2012, 256 pp., £20.00, ISBN-10 184614471X In What Money Can’t Buy, Sandel argues that there has been a shift, over the last 30 years, from a market economy to what he refers to as a market society – where almost ‘everything is up for sale’ (p. 8). According to Sandel, the ubiquitous presence of markets in our everyday life demands scrutiny and the role of markets in a democratic society debated. It is the aim of the book to open up the debate by asking, ‘what role should markets play in public life and personal relations? How can we decide which goods should be bought and sold, and which should be gov- erned by non-market values?’ (p. 11). The book is crammed full of examples of the intrusion of market values into spheres of life which were formally governed by non-market values. These examples include: the use of private military contractors (where Sandel notes that in Iraq and Afghanistan, private military contractors outnumbered US troops); offering drug-addicted women $300 to

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2013 John Ferguson
ISSN
2156-2245
eISSN
0969-160X
DOI
10.1080/0969160X.2013.845040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social and Environmental Accountability Journal, 2013 Vol. 33, No. 3, 185 – 188 Book Reviews What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets Michael Sandel London: Allen Lane, 2012, 256 pp., £20.00, ISBN-10 184614471X In What Money Can’t Buy, Sandel argues that there has been a shift, over the last 30 years, from a market economy to what he refers to as a market society – where almost ‘everything is up for sale’ (p. 8). According to Sandel, the ubiquitous presence of markets in our everyday life demands scrutiny and the role of markets in a democratic society debated. It is the aim of the book to open up the debate by asking, ‘what role should markets play in public life and personal relations? How can we decide which goods should be bought and sold, and which should be gov- erned by non-market values?’ (p. 11). The book is crammed full of examples of the intrusion of market values into spheres of life which were formally governed by non-market values. These examples include: the use of private military contractors (where Sandel notes that in Iraq and Afghanistan, private military contractors outnumbered US troops); offering drug-addicted women $300 to

Journal

Social and Environmental Accountability JournalTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.