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Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? Postmodern Polemics in Contemporary Korean Art

Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? Postmodern Polemics in Contemporary Korean Art Art in Translation, 2023 Volume 14, Issue 4, pp. 1–10, http://doi.org/10.1080/17561310.2022.2170721 # 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? Postmodern Polemics in Contemporary Jung-Ah Woo Korean Art This is a collection of essays that discussed the nature of postmodernism and its plausibility in South Korea in the early 1990s. In the mid-1980s, the Korean art community was split between two opposing factions: Dansaekhwa, or monochrome painting, as a dominant school of “Korean Modernism” and the radical art movement of Minjung misul, or People’s art. Dansaekhwa is an artistic movement that emerged in the mid-1970s, characterized by restrained and refined abstract paintings using neutral colors. Although the works of Dansaekhwa are comparable in their reduced forms to American Color field painting, Minimalism, and 2 Jung-Ah Woo Japanese Mono-ha, Dansaekhwa artists paid more attention to the material properties of conventional media, such as canvas, paper, paint and pencil, and emphasized the contemplative nature of their bodily dis- cipline in exercising the repetitive motions to create the abstract pat- terns. By the late 1970s, Dansaekhwa’s self-referentiality and rejection of pictorialism were firmly established as a strict norm of academic and institutional art in Korea. Under http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Art In Translation Taylor & Francis

Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? Postmodern Polemics in Contemporary Korean Art

Art In Translation , Volume 14 (4): 10 – Oct 2, 2022
10 pages

Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? Postmodern Polemics in Contemporary Korean Art

Abstract

Art in Translation, 2023 Volume 14, Issue 4, pp. 1–10, http://doi.org/10.1080/17561310.2022.2170721 # 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? Postmodern Polemics in Contemporary Jung-Ah Woo Korean Art This is a collection of essays that discussed the nature of postmodernism and its plausibility in South Korea in the early 1990s. In the mid-1980s, the Korean art community was split between two opposing factions: Dansaekhwa, or...
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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1756-1310
DOI
10.1080/17561310.2022.2170721
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Art in Translation, 2023 Volume 14, Issue 4, pp. 1–10, http://doi.org/10.1080/17561310.2022.2170721 # 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? Postmodern Polemics in Contemporary Jung-Ah Woo Korean Art This is a collection of essays that discussed the nature of postmodernism and its plausibility in South Korea in the early 1990s. In the mid-1980s, the Korean art community was split between two opposing factions: Dansaekhwa, or monochrome painting, as a dominant school of “Korean Modernism” and the radical art movement of Minjung misul, or People’s art. Dansaekhwa is an artistic movement that emerged in the mid-1970s, characterized by restrained and refined abstract paintings using neutral colors. Although the works of Dansaekhwa are comparable in their reduced forms to American Color field painting, Minimalism, and 2 Jung-Ah Woo Japanese Mono-ha, Dansaekhwa artists paid more attention to the material properties of conventional media, such as canvas, paper, paint and pencil, and emphasized the contemplative nature of their bodily dis- cipline in exercising the repetitive motions to create the abstract pat- terns. By the late 1970s, Dansaekhwa’s self-referentiality and rejection of pictorialism were firmly established as a strict norm of academic and institutional art in Korea. Under

Journal

Art In TranslationTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 2, 2022

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