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Whose Ideas Matter? Agency and Power in Asian Regionalism

Whose Ideas Matter? Agency and Power in Asian Regionalism Australian Journal of International Affairs Vol. 66, No. 2, pp. 277284, April 2012 Book reviews Amitav Acharya, Whose Ideas Matter? Agency and Power in Asian Regionalism. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2010, pp. 189, ISBN 978 9 8142 7915 4. Reading Amitav Acharya’s Whose Ideas Matter? is instructive in light of the reaction of Asian leaders to Kevin Rudd’s recent proposal for a new regionalism initiative, the Asia- Pacific Community. The largely negative reaction from members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), in particular, was strikingly similar to their initial reactions to previous attempts to challenge the regional architecture through initiatives like the Pacific Community and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum. Acharya argues that the successes and failures of such regional initiatives depended on the extent to which they conformed with, or could be ‘localised’ to align with, the norms associated with ASEAN, which include the norm of non-intervention, procedural norms of consensus, non-legalism, informality, non-binding resolutions and the avoidance of contentious bilateral issues. He builds the argument that these norms have their roots in early Asian and Afro-Asian meetings like the 1947 Asian Relations Conference and the Bandung Conference of 1955, and the articulation of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of International Affairs Taylor & Francis

Whose Ideas Matter? Agency and Power in Asian Regionalism

Australian Journal of International Affairs , Volume 66 (2): 2 – Apr 1, 2012
2 pages

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References (2)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Priya Chacko
ISSN
1465-332X
eISSN
1035-7718
DOI
10.1080/10357718.2012.658617
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Australian Journal of International Affairs Vol. 66, No. 2, pp. 277284, April 2012 Book reviews Amitav Acharya, Whose Ideas Matter? Agency and Power in Asian Regionalism. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2010, pp. 189, ISBN 978 9 8142 7915 4. Reading Amitav Acharya’s Whose Ideas Matter? is instructive in light of the reaction of Asian leaders to Kevin Rudd’s recent proposal for a new regionalism initiative, the Asia- Pacific Community. The largely negative reaction from members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), in particular, was strikingly similar to their initial reactions to previous attempts to challenge the regional architecture through initiatives like the Pacific Community and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum. Acharya argues that the successes and failures of such regional initiatives depended on the extent to which they conformed with, or could be ‘localised’ to align with, the norms associated with ASEAN, which include the norm of non-intervention, procedural norms of consensus, non-legalism, informality, non-binding resolutions and the avoidance of contentious bilateral issues. He builds the argument that these norms have their roots in early Asian and Afro-Asian meetings like the 1947 Asian Relations Conference and the Bandung Conference of 1955, and the articulation of

Journal

Australian Journal of International AffairsTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 2012

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