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‘Why do your people do things that just aren’t right’? Latinas/os and race relations at a community clinic in el Nuevo south

‘Why do your people do things that just aren’t right’? Latinas/os and race relations at a... In el nuevo South, the immigration of Latinas/os complicates our understanding of relations between races. Drawing on 18 months of participant observation, I explore how the employees of a community clinic decided to regulate health-care access and how race and the perception of ‘who is entitled’ figured into their practices. My study shows how racial conflicts influence access to public resources, such as health care, and how those conflicts stem from constructions of citizenship, social membership, and belonging. This article sheds light on race relations in a new immigrant destination, explores workplace conditions that might incite racial conflict, and highlights racialised constructions of citizenship and belonging. It concludes that the resulting stressful work conditions at the clinic, lack of resources, and threat from ‘the other’ fomented racial conflict between African-Americans and Latinas. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies Taylor & Francis

‘Why do your people do things that just aren’t right’? Latinas/os and race relations at a community clinic in el Nuevo south

Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies , Volume 43 (6): 17 – Apr 26, 2017

‘Why do your people do things that just aren’t right’? Latinas/os and race relations at a community clinic in el Nuevo south

Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies , Volume 43 (6): 17 – Apr 26, 2017

Abstract

In el nuevo South, the immigration of Latinas/os complicates our understanding of relations between races. Drawing on 18 months of participant observation, I explore how the employees of a community clinic decided to regulate health-care access and how race and the perception of ‘who is entitled’ figured into their practices. My study shows how racial conflicts influence access to public resources, such as health care, and how those conflicts stem from constructions of citizenship, social membership, and belonging. This article sheds light on race relations in a new immigrant destination, explores workplace conditions that might incite racial conflict, and highlights racialised constructions of citizenship and belonging. It concludes that the resulting stressful work conditions at the clinic, lack of resources, and threat from ‘the other’ fomented racial conflict between African-Americans and Latinas.

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References (73)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1469-9451
eISSN
1369-183X
DOI
10.1080/1369183X.2016.1220291
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In el nuevo South, the immigration of Latinas/os complicates our understanding of relations between races. Drawing on 18 months of participant observation, I explore how the employees of a community clinic decided to regulate health-care access and how race and the perception of ‘who is entitled’ figured into their practices. My study shows how racial conflicts influence access to public resources, such as health care, and how those conflicts stem from constructions of citizenship, social membership, and belonging. This article sheds light on race relations in a new immigrant destination, explores workplace conditions that might incite racial conflict, and highlights racialised constructions of citizenship and belonging. It concludes that the resulting stressful work conditions at the clinic, lack of resources, and threat from ‘the other’ fomented racial conflict between African-Americans and Latinas.

Journal

Journal of Ethnic and Migration StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 26, 2017

Keywords: El nuevo South; racial conflict; othering

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