Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Winter diet and lead poisoning risk of Greater Spotted Eagles Clanga clanga in southeast Spain

Winter diet and lead poisoning risk of Greater Spotted Eagles Clanga clanga in southeast Spain Capsule: Diet analysis revealed high lead exposure for Greater Spotted Eagles Clanga clanga wintering in southeast Spain. Aims: To describe the diet composition of the endangered Greater Spotted Eagle in a wintering area located in southeast Spain, and determine lead ammunition exposure through analysis of regurgitated pellets and prey remains. Methods: Between 2008 and 2018, a total of 26 pellets, 29 prey remains and 10 direct predation observations were collected in El Hondo Natural Park, Spain. All the pellets and 10 prey remains were analysed with X-ray in order to detect metal from ammunition. Results: Greater Spotted Eagles fed mainly on birds, with 18 different species accounting for 73.1% of prey items and 66.1% of biomass consumed. The most frequent species identified were Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus (23.1%), rats Rattus spp. (15.4%) and Common Teal Anas crecca (8.9%). Ammunition was detected in 42.3% of regurgitated pellets and in 40.0% of prey remains analysed. Of those containing ammunition, lead shot was found in 63.9% of pellets and 25.0% of prey remains. Conclusion: High lead shot presence in pellets and prey remains of wintering Greater Spotted Eagles in southeast Spain warns of a high risk of lead poisoning. Factors such as feeding behaviour, the large space–time overlap between the raptor presence and the waterbird hunting season and non-compliance with the ban on the use of lead ammunition are likely contributing to high lead exposure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bird Study Taylor & Francis

Winter diet and lead poisoning risk of Greater Spotted Eagles Clanga clanga in southeast Spain

Winter diet and lead poisoning risk of Greater Spotted Eagles Clanga clanga in southeast Spain

Bird Study , Volume 67 (2): 8 – Apr 2, 2020

Abstract

Capsule: Diet analysis revealed high lead exposure for Greater Spotted Eagles Clanga clanga wintering in southeast Spain. Aims: To describe the diet composition of the endangered Greater Spotted Eagle in a wintering area located in southeast Spain, and determine lead ammunition exposure through analysis of regurgitated pellets and prey remains. Methods: Between 2008 and 2018, a total of 26 pellets, 29 prey remains and 10 direct predation observations were collected in El Hondo Natural Park, Spain. All the pellets and 10 prey remains were analysed with X-ray in order to detect metal from ammunition. Results: Greater Spotted Eagles fed mainly on birds, with 18 different species accounting for 73.1% of prey items and 66.1% of biomass consumed. The most frequent species identified were Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus (23.1%), rats Rattus spp. (15.4%) and Common Teal Anas crecca (8.9%). Ammunition was detected in 42.3% of regurgitated pellets and in 40.0% of prey remains analysed. Of those containing ammunition, lead shot was found in 63.9% of pellets and 25.0% of prey remains. Conclusion: High lead shot presence in pellets and prey remains of wintering Greater Spotted Eagles in southeast Spain warns of a high risk of lead poisoning. Factors such as feeding behaviour, the large space–time overlap between the raptor presence and the waterbird hunting season and non-compliance with the ban on the use of lead ammunition are likely contributing to high lead exposure.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/winter-diet-and-lead-poisoning-risk-of-greater-spotted-eagles-clanga-BxD0PEVb1Y

References (38)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 British Trust for Ornithology
ISSN
1944-6705
eISSN
0006-3657
DOI
10.1080/00063657.2020.1810206
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Capsule: Diet analysis revealed high lead exposure for Greater Spotted Eagles Clanga clanga wintering in southeast Spain. Aims: To describe the diet composition of the endangered Greater Spotted Eagle in a wintering area located in southeast Spain, and determine lead ammunition exposure through analysis of regurgitated pellets and prey remains. Methods: Between 2008 and 2018, a total of 26 pellets, 29 prey remains and 10 direct predation observations were collected in El Hondo Natural Park, Spain. All the pellets and 10 prey remains were analysed with X-ray in order to detect metal from ammunition. Results: Greater Spotted Eagles fed mainly on birds, with 18 different species accounting for 73.1% of prey items and 66.1% of biomass consumed. The most frequent species identified were Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus (23.1%), rats Rattus spp. (15.4%) and Common Teal Anas crecca (8.9%). Ammunition was detected in 42.3% of regurgitated pellets and in 40.0% of prey remains analysed. Of those containing ammunition, lead shot was found in 63.9% of pellets and 25.0% of prey remains. Conclusion: High lead shot presence in pellets and prey remains of wintering Greater Spotted Eagles in southeast Spain warns of a high risk of lead poisoning. Factors such as feeding behaviour, the large space–time overlap between the raptor presence and the waterbird hunting season and non-compliance with the ban on the use of lead ammunition are likely contributing to high lead exposure.

Journal

Bird StudyTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 2, 2020

There are no references for this article.