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Biaxial incremental homeostatic elastic moduli of coronary artery: two-layer model

Biaxial incremental homeostatic elastic moduli of coronary artery: two-layer model The detailed mechanical properties of various layers of the coronary artery are important for understanding the function of the vessel. The present article is focused on the determination of the incremental modulus in different layers and directions in the neighborhood of the in vivo state. The incremental modulus can be defined for any material subjected to a large deformation if small perturbations in strain lead to small perturbations of stresses in a linear fashion. This analysis was applied to the porcine coronary artery, which was treated as a two-layered structure consisting of an inner intima-media layer and an outer adventitia layer. We adopted a theory based on small-perturbation experiments at homeostatic conditions for determination of incremental moduli in circumferential, axial, and cross directions in the two layers. The experiments were based on inflation and axial stretch. We demonstrate that under homeostatic conditions the incremental moduli are layer- and direction dependent. The incremental modulus is highest in the circumferential direction. Furthermore, in the circumferential direction, the media is stiffer than the whole wall, which is stiffer than the adventitia. In the axial direction, the adventitia is stiffer than the intact wall, which is stiffer than the media. Hence, the coronary artery must be treated as a composite, nonisotropic body. The data acquire physiological relevance in relation to coronary artery health and disease. stress; strain; media; adventitia; constitutive equation Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: G. S. Kassab, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Univ. of California, Irvine, 204 Rockwell Engineering Ctr., Irvine, CA 92697-2715 (E-mail: gkassab@uci.edu ) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Heart and Circulatory Physiology The American Physiological Society

Biaxial incremental homeostatic elastic moduli of coronary artery: two-layer model

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6135
eISSN
1522-1539
DOI
10.1152/ajpheart.00226.2004
pmid
15371266
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The detailed mechanical properties of various layers of the coronary artery are important for understanding the function of the vessel. The present article is focused on the determination of the incremental modulus in different layers and directions in the neighborhood of the in vivo state. The incremental modulus can be defined for any material subjected to a large deformation if small perturbations in strain lead to small perturbations of stresses in a linear fashion. This analysis was applied to the porcine coronary artery, which was treated as a two-layered structure consisting of an inner intima-media layer and an outer adventitia layer. We adopted a theory based on small-perturbation experiments at homeostatic conditions for determination of incremental moduli in circumferential, axial, and cross directions in the two layers. The experiments were based on inflation and axial stretch. We demonstrate that under homeostatic conditions the incremental moduli are layer- and direction dependent. The incremental modulus is highest in the circumferential direction. Furthermore, in the circumferential direction, the media is stiffer than the whole wall, which is stiffer than the adventitia. In the axial direction, the adventitia is stiffer than the intact wall, which is stiffer than the media. Hence, the coronary artery must be treated as a composite, nonisotropic body. The data acquire physiological relevance in relation to coronary artery health and disease. stress; strain; media; adventitia; constitutive equation Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: G. S. Kassab, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Univ. of California, Irvine, 204 Rockwell Engineering Ctr., Irvine, CA 92697-2715 (E-mail: gkassab@uci.edu )

Journal

AJP - Heart and Circulatory PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Oct 1, 2004

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