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Osteoblasts respond to pulsatile fluid flow with short-term increases in PGE2 but no change in mineralization

Osteoblasts respond to pulsatile fluid flow with short-term increases in PGE2 but no change in... Abstract Although there is no consensus as to the precise nature of the mechanostimulatory signals imparted to the bone cells during remodeling, it has been postulated that deformation-induced fluid flow plays a role in the mechanotransduction pathway. In vitro, osteoblasts respond to fluid shear stress with an increase in PGE 2 production; however, the long-term effects of fluid shear stress on cell proliferation and differentiation have not been examined. The goal of this study was to apply continuous pulsatile fluid shear stresses to osteoblasts and determine whether the initial production of PGE 2 is associated with long-term biochemical changes. The acute response of bone cells to a pulsatile fluid shear stress (0.6 ± 0.5 Pa, 3.0 Hz) was characterized by a transient fourfold increase in PGE 2 production. After 7 days of static culture (0 dyn/cm 2 ) or low (0.06 ± 0.05 Pa, 0.3 Hz) or high (0.6 ± 0.5 Pa, 3.0 Hz) levels of pulsatile fluid shear stress, the bone cells responded with an 83% average increase in cell number, but no statistical difference ( P > 0.53) between the groups was observed. Alkaline phosphatase activity per cell decreased in the static cultures but not in the low- or high-flow groups. Mineralization was also unaffected by the different levels of applied shear stress. Our results indicate that short-term changes in PGE 2 levels caused by pulsatile fluid flow are not associated with long-term changes in proliferation or mineralization of bone cells. bone remodeling parallel-plate flow chamber tissue engineering Footnotes Support for this work was supplied by NASA (NAG2-1371), the National Science Foundation (BES-9820113), Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation, Orthopaedics Research and Educational Foundation, and Merck/United Negro College Fund. Additional support was provided by the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program (E. A. Nauman), the Berkeley Fellowship Program (E. A. Nauman), a UNCF/Merck Fellowship (R. L. Satcher), and the Veterans Affairs Merit Review Program (B. P. Halloran). Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: E. A. Nauman, 500 Lindy Boggs Center, New Orleans, LA 70118-5674 (E-mail: enauman@tulane.edu ). The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 2001 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Osteoblasts respond to pulsatile fluid flow with short-term increases in PGE2 but no change in mineralization

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract Although there is no consensus as to the precise nature of the mechanostimulatory signals imparted to the bone cells during remodeling, it has been postulated that deformation-induced fluid flow plays a role in the mechanotransduction pathway. In vitro, osteoblasts respond to fluid shear stress with an increase in PGE 2 production; however, the long-term effects of fluid shear stress on cell proliferation and differentiation have not been examined. The goal of this study was to apply continuous pulsatile fluid shear stresses to osteoblasts and determine whether the initial production of PGE 2 is associated with long-term biochemical changes. The acute response of bone cells to a pulsatile fluid shear stress (0.6 ± 0.5 Pa, 3.0 Hz) was characterized by a transient fourfold increase in PGE 2 production. After 7 days of static culture (0 dyn/cm 2 ) or low (0.06 ± 0.05 Pa, 0.3 Hz) or high (0.6 ± 0.5 Pa, 3.0 Hz) levels of pulsatile fluid shear stress, the bone cells responded with an 83% average increase in cell number, but no statistical difference ( P > 0.53) between the groups was observed. Alkaline phosphatase activity per cell decreased in the static cultures but not in the low- or high-flow groups. Mineralization was also unaffected by the different levels of applied shear stress. Our results indicate that short-term changes in PGE 2 levels caused by pulsatile fluid flow are not associated with long-term changes in proliferation or mineralization of bone cells. bone remodeling parallel-plate flow chamber tissue engineering Footnotes Support for this work was supplied by NASA (NAG2-1371), the National Science Foundation (BES-9820113), Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation, Orthopaedics Research and Educational Foundation, and Merck/United Negro College Fund. Additional support was provided by the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program (E. A. Nauman), the Berkeley Fellowship Program (E. A. Nauman), a UNCF/Merck Fellowship (R. L. Satcher), and the Veterans Affairs Merit Review Program (B. P. Halloran). Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: E. A. Nauman, 500 Lindy Boggs Center, New Orleans, LA 70118-5674 (E-mail: enauman@tulane.edu ). The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 2001 the American Physiological Society

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: May 1, 2001

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