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VEGF kinase inhibitors: how do they cause hypertension?

VEGF kinase inhibitors: how do they cause hypertension? Abstract Neoangiogenesis is a critical phenomenon enabling the growth and metastasis of tumors, and inhibitors of neoangiogenesis have been recently added to the armamentarium of anticancer therapies available for clinical use. Dysregulated signaling through the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway has been implicated as a key mediator of neoangiogenesis in tumors. Agents that block signaling through the VEGF pathway demonstrated tumor shrinkage in preclinical models and were therefore developed as anticancer therapies for use in humans. VEGF kinase inhibitors are being used in the treatment of a wide variety of cancers, and recent studies have shown that patients will likely require long-term treatment with these agents. Hypertension has emerged as a frequent side effect associated with agents that block signaling through the VEGF pathway. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying hypertension is crucial to developing appropriate therapeutic strategies for treating hypertension associated with VEGF kinase inhibitors. Several recent studies have advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension associated with VEGF kinase inhibitors and will be the subject of this review. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology The American Physiological Society

VEGF kinase inhibitors: how do they cause hypertension?

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6119
eISSN
1522-1490
DOI
10.1152/ajpregu.90502.2008
pmid
19439616
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Neoangiogenesis is a critical phenomenon enabling the growth and metastasis of tumors, and inhibitors of neoangiogenesis have been recently added to the armamentarium of anticancer therapies available for clinical use. Dysregulated signaling through the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway has been implicated as a key mediator of neoangiogenesis in tumors. Agents that block signaling through the VEGF pathway demonstrated tumor shrinkage in preclinical models and were therefore developed as anticancer therapies for use in humans. VEGF kinase inhibitors are being used in the treatment of a wide variety of cancers, and recent studies have shown that patients will likely require long-term treatment with these agents. Hypertension has emerged as a frequent side effect associated with agents that block signaling through the VEGF pathway. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying hypertension is crucial to developing appropriate therapeutic strategies for treating hypertension associated with VEGF kinase inhibitors. Several recent studies have advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension associated with VEGF kinase inhibitors and will be the subject of this review.

Journal

AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jul 1, 2009

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