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Community-Associated MRSA — Resistance and Virulence Converge

Community-Associated MRSA — Resistance and Virulence Converge Laypeople and health care professionals alike recognize Staphylococcus aureus as an important cause of disease and understand that antibiotic-resistant strains pose a threat to the community. Before the availability of antibiotics, invasive staphylococcal disease was often fatal, and the introduction of penicillin in the 1940s dramatically improved survival. Although penicillinase-producing strains soon emerged, methicillin and other penicillinase-stable β-lactam agents filled the breach. However, methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus (MRSA), which are resistant to the entire class of β-lactam agents, were identified almost immediately and are now found in hospitals worldwide. Despite the growing prevalence of MRSA in hospitals, these strains . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The New England Journal of Medicine The New England Journal of Medicine

Community-Associated MRSA — Resistance and Virulence Converge

The New England Journal of Medicine , Volume 352 (14): 3 – Apr 7, 2005

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References (12)

Publisher
The New England Journal of Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0028-4793
eISSN
1533-4406
DOI
10.1056/NEJMe058023
pmid
15814886
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Laypeople and health care professionals alike recognize Staphylococcus aureus as an important cause of disease and understand that antibiotic-resistant strains pose a threat to the community. Before the availability of antibiotics, invasive staphylococcal disease was often fatal, and the introduction of penicillin in the 1940s dramatically improved survival. Although penicillinase-producing strains soon emerged, methicillin and other penicillinase-stable β-lactam agents filled the breach. However, methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus (MRSA), which are resistant to the entire class of β-lactam agents, were identified almost immediately and are now found in hospitals worldwide. Despite the growing prevalence of MRSA in hospitals, these strains . . .

Journal

The New England Journal of MedicineThe New England Journal of Medicine

Published: Apr 7, 2005

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