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Cost Effectiveness of Autologous Blood Donation

Cost Effectiveness of Autologous Blood Donation To the Editor: The bleak conclusions that Etchason and colleagues offer about the limited usefulness and high costs of autologous blood donation (March 16 issue)1 seem premature and unwarranted. The ability to test and eliminate most donors with hepatitis B or C or the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an important advance but does not ensure a completely safe blood supply. Just this year, new hepatitis viruses have been identified2; at least one is transmitted through blood transfusion (Alter HJ: personal communication). Many additional bacterial, viral, and protozoal infections are problems, and other complications of allogeneic blood transfusion are . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The New England Journal of Medicine The New England Journal of Medicine

Cost Effectiveness of Autologous Blood Donation

The New England Journal of Medicine , Volume 333 (7): 3 – Aug 17, 1995

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References (12)

Publisher
The New England Journal of Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0028-4793
eISSN
1533-4406
DOI
10.1056/NEJM199508173330717
pmid
7617007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor: The bleak conclusions that Etchason and colleagues offer about the limited usefulness and high costs of autologous blood donation (March 16 issue)1 seem premature and unwarranted. The ability to test and eliminate most donors with hepatitis B or C or the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an important advance but does not ensure a completely safe blood supply. Just this year, new hepatitis viruses have been identified2; at least one is transmitted through blood transfusion (Alter HJ: personal communication). Many additional bacterial, viral, and protozoal infections are problems, and other complications of allogeneic blood transfusion are . . .

Journal

The New England Journal of MedicineThe New England Journal of Medicine

Published: Aug 17, 1995

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