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Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus — CD4 is Not Enough

Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus — CD4 is Not Enough The interaction between the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its cellular target once seemed fairly simple: the virus attached to the CD4 molecule on the cell surface, entered the cell, and began its replicative cycle.1 However, in the past few years, research has turned up surprising evidence that the virus can bind to cells by means of receptors other than CD4. These alternative receptors include galactosylceramide on brain and bowel cells and, when the virus has formed a complex with antibody, Fc receptors. Binding through Fc receptors can actually enhance viral infection.1 Recent studies of the early events in HIV . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The New England Journal of Medicine The New England Journal of Medicine

Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus — CD4 is Not Enough

The New England Journal of Medicine , Volume 335 (20): 3 – Nov 14, 1996

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References (14)

Publisher
The New England Journal of Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0028-4793
eISSN
1533-4406
DOI
10.1056/NEJM199611143352011
pmid
8890107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The interaction between the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its cellular target once seemed fairly simple: the virus attached to the CD4 molecule on the cell surface, entered the cell, and began its replicative cycle.1 However, in the past few years, research has turned up surprising evidence that the virus can bind to cells by means of receptors other than CD4. These alternative receptors include galactosylceramide on brain and bowel cells and, when the virus has formed a complex with antibody, Fc receptors. Binding through Fc receptors can actually enhance viral infection.1 Recent studies of the early events in HIV . . .

Journal

The New England Journal of MedicineThe New England Journal of Medicine

Published: Nov 14, 1996

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