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Polygenes, Risk Prediction, and Targeted Prevention of Breast Cancer

Polygenes, Risk Prediction, and Targeted Prevention of Breast Cancer To the Editor: In their discussion of polygenics and breast cancer, Pharoah et al. (June 26 issue)1 do not mention cost-effectiveness. If we take 3% for the reduction in total disease burden estimated by Pharoah et al. and apply it to the calculated 0.6-year increase in life expectancy if all breast cancers were eliminated,2 current polygenic tests would increase life expectancy by just 1 week for the whole female population. Although the gain is modest, the relatively low cost of implementing the polygenic approach makes it attractive when one considers the estimated additional quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Even a comprehensive . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The New England Journal of Medicine The New England Journal of Medicine

Polygenes, Risk Prediction, and Targeted Prevention of Breast Cancer

The New England Journal of Medicine , Volume 359 (13): 2 – Sep 25, 2008

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References (13)

Publisher
The New England Journal of Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0028-4793
eISSN
1533-4406
DOI
10.1056/NEJMc081550
pmid
18815404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor: In their discussion of polygenics and breast cancer, Pharoah et al. (June 26 issue)1 do not mention cost-effectiveness. If we take 3% for the reduction in total disease burden estimated by Pharoah et al. and apply it to the calculated 0.6-year increase in life expectancy if all breast cancers were eliminated,2 current polygenic tests would increase life expectancy by just 1 week for the whole female population. Although the gain is modest, the relatively low cost of implementing the polygenic approach makes it attractive when one considers the estimated additional quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Even a comprehensive . . .

Journal

The New England Journal of MedicineThe New England Journal of Medicine

Published: Sep 25, 2008

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