Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Severe Anomaly of Coronary-Artery Development

Severe Anomaly of Coronary-Artery Development To the Editor: A three-week-old boy was admitted to the hospital because of cardiac failure with diffuse ventricular hypocontractility and normal cardiac anatomy on echocardiography. Coronary and ventricular angiography failed to show any coronary arteries from the aortic root, the pulmonary arteries, or the ventricular cavities (Figure 1A). No coronary artery was visible on the surface of the heart at the time of exploratory sternotomy. The baby died suddenly afterward. Postmortem examination revealed a dense network of coronary veins (Figure 1B) and a very short coronary arterial segment in the posterior atrioventricular sulcus (Figure 1C). The right ventricle, tricuspid valve, . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The New England Journal of Medicine The New England Journal of Medicine

Severe Anomaly of Coronary-Artery Development

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-new-england-journal-of-medicine/severe-anomaly-of-coronary-artery-development-ohpYPawwbI

References (5)

Publisher
The New England Journal of Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0028-4793
eISSN
1533-4406
DOI
10.1056/NEJMc060276
pmid
16899788
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor: A three-week-old boy was admitted to the hospital because of cardiac failure with diffuse ventricular hypocontractility and normal cardiac anatomy on echocardiography. Coronary and ventricular angiography failed to show any coronary arteries from the aortic root, the pulmonary arteries, or the ventricular cavities (Figure 1A). No coronary artery was visible on the surface of the heart at the time of exploratory sternotomy. The baby died suddenly afterward. Postmortem examination revealed a dense network of coronary veins (Figure 1B) and a very short coronary arterial segment in the posterior atrioventricular sulcus (Figure 1C). The right ventricle, tricuspid valve, . . .

Journal

The New England Journal of MedicineThe New England Journal of Medicine

Published: Aug 10, 2006

There are no references for this article.