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Editor's Note

Editor's Note The articles in this issue share insights into the mask performance of Indonesia and Japan and, in preliminary ways, point to connections to India, China, or Central Asia. Anyone who does research on the traditional arts of Asia recognizes current geopolitical borders cause interpretations of practice to be slanted to "fit" contemporary realities. For example, the relation of the Balinese Barong mask, the Chinese lion, and the Japanese Shi-shi are apparent and have certainly been noted by scholars in passing. But few in Indonesian studies, where I work, have dug much deeper. The popular nature of the performances gave lion genres low stature in artistic circles. What is more, Indonesian politics from 1965 to 1998 militated against recognition of Chinese linkages to Indonesian art. Connections to Japan were, likewise, prior to the 1980s deemphasized--the World War II Japanese occupation of Indonesia still clouded the relationship between the two countries. For such links that may come from a common heritage, a "don't ask and don't tell" policy sat in place on the Indonesian side and has only begun to change in the post-Suharto era. What is more, most theatre scholars train as specialists with linguistic and cultural limits. This http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The articles in this issue share insights into the mask performance of Indonesia and Japan and, in preliminary ways, point to connections to India, China, or Central Asia. Anyone who does research on the traditional arts of Asia recognizes current geopolitical borders cause interpretations of practice to be slanted to "fit" contemporary realities. For example, the relation of the Balinese Barong mask, the Chinese lion, and the Japanese Shi-shi are apparent and have certainly been noted by scholars in passing. But few in Indonesian studies, where I work, have dug much deeper. The popular nature of the performances gave lion genres low stature in artistic circles. What is more, Indonesian politics from 1965 to 1998 militated against recognition of Chinese linkages to Indonesian art. Connections to Japan were, likewise, prior to the 1980s deemphasized--the World War II Japanese occupation of Indonesia still clouded the relationship between the two countries. For such links that may come from a common heritage, a "don't ask and don't tell" policy sat in place on the Indonesian side and has only begun to change in the post-Suharto era. What is more, most theatre scholars train as specialists with linguistic and cultural limits. This

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 31, 2005

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