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Contexts and Complexities: A Case Study in Evolving Participatory Watershed Stewardship

Contexts and Complexities: A Case Study in Evolving Participatory Watershed Stewardship The actions of organizations and individuals shaped an evolving practice of participatory watershed stewardship of Contra Costa County, California, between 1980 and 2006. This study applies Stokols’s (2006) transdisciplinary action research (TDAR) framework to examine how various organizational and volunteer dimensions of watershed stewardship emerged to shape watershed stewardship within the county. Cast from a TDAR perspective and based on participatory research, site visits, interviews, observations, and local watershed documents, this study demonstrates how organizations and individual volunteer practices evolved to manage watershed stewardship across multiple scales. Transdisciplinarity when applied to participatory watershed stewardship involves the generation of knowledge through four primary approaches: (1) participation, (2) collaboration, (3) management, and (4) physical signs of care and ownership. The physical results are the creation of riparian habitat landscapes shaped by local volunteers and watershed groups. Both governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have developed multidimensional and transdisciplinary approaches to watershed stewardship by incorporating the ecological, physical, and social components across geographic scale. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscape Journal: design, planning, and management of the land University of Wisconsin Press

Contexts and Complexities: A Case Study in Evolving Participatory Watershed Stewardship

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1553-2704

Abstract

The actions of organizations and individuals shaped an evolving practice of participatory watershed stewardship of Contra Costa County, California, between 1980 and 2006. This study applies Stokols’s (2006) transdisciplinary action research (TDAR) framework to examine how various organizational and volunteer dimensions of watershed stewardship emerged to shape watershed stewardship within the county. Cast from a TDAR perspective and based on participatory research, site visits, interviews, observations, and local watershed documents, this study demonstrates how organizations and individual volunteer practices evolved to manage watershed stewardship across multiple scales. Transdisciplinarity when applied to participatory watershed stewardship involves the generation of knowledge through four primary approaches: (1) participation, (2) collaboration, (3) management, and (4) physical signs of care and ownership. The physical results are the creation of riparian habitat landscapes shaped by local volunteers and watershed groups. Both governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have developed multidimensional and transdisciplinary approaches to watershed stewardship by incorporating the ecological, physical, and social components across geographic scale.

Journal

Landscape Journal: design, planning, and management of the landUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 22, 2011

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