Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Do not publish

Do not publish Do not publish: limit open access information on rare and endangered species 1 1 David Lindenmayer and Ben Scheele Threatened Species Recovery Hub, National Environmental Science Program, Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia David.Lindenmayer@anu.edu.au Ben.Scheele@anu.edu.au Biological sciences have long valued publishing detailed information on rare and endangered species. Until a few decades ago, much of this information was hidden from the public, accessible only through relatively obscure scientific journals. However, much of these data have been transferred online with the advent of digital platforms and a rapid push to open access publication. Information is increasingly also available online in public reports and wildlife atlases, and research published behind paywalls can commonly be found in the public domain. Many benefits flow from increased data and information accessibility, including improved repeatability in scientific studies and enhanced collaboration (1, 2). While these benefits should be embraced, in the context of conserving endangered species, there are major problems created by such readily accessible information. Increasingly, the dual use research dilemma (sensu (3)), in which research can have both significant positive but also negative impacts, is pervading research on rare and endangered species with information intended http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science Unpaywall

Do not publish

ScienceMay 26, 2017
7 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/unpaywall/do-not-publish-mJuYbufbng

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Unpaywall
ISSN
0036-8075
DOI
10.1126/science.aan1362
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Do not publish: limit open access information on rare and endangered species 1 1 David Lindenmayer and Ben Scheele Threatened Species Recovery Hub, National Environmental Science Program, Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia David.Lindenmayer@anu.edu.au Ben.Scheele@anu.edu.au Biological sciences have long valued publishing detailed information on rare and endangered species. Until a few decades ago, much of this information was hidden from the public, accessible only through relatively obscure scientific journals. However, much of these data have been transferred online with the advent of digital platforms and a rapid push to open access publication. Information is increasingly also available online in public reports and wildlife atlases, and research published behind paywalls can commonly be found in the public domain. Many benefits flow from increased data and information accessibility, including improved repeatability in scientific studies and enhanced collaboration (1, 2). While these benefits should be embraced, in the context of conserving endangered species, there are major problems created by such readily accessible information. Increasingly, the dual use research dilemma (sensu (3)), in which research can have both significant positive but also negative impacts, is pervading research on rare and endangered species with information intended

Journal

ScienceUnpaywall

Published: May 26, 2017

There are no references for this article.