Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Paying The Price For Unreliable Power Supplies: In-House Generation Of Electricity By Firms In Africa

Paying The Price For Unreliable Power Supplies: In-House Generation Of Electricity By Firms In... This paper documents the prevalence of in-house percent in the low-income countries, the post-conflict generation of electric power by firms in Sub-Saharan countries, and more generally on the Western side of Africa and attempts to identify the underlying causes. the continent. In a handful of countries own generation The analysis is based on two data sources. The UDI represents more than 20 percent of capacity. World Electric Power Plants Data Base (WEPP), a Rigorous empirical analysis shows that unreliable global inventory of electric power generating units, public power supplies is far from being the only or even provides a detailed inventory of in-house generation at the largest factor driving generator ownership. Firm the country level. The World Bank’s Enterprise Survey characteristics have a major influence—in particular, Database captures business perceptions of the obstacles to the probability of owning a generator doubles in large enterprise growth for 8,483 currently operating firms in firms relative to small ones. Our model predicts that the 25 African countries. prevalence of own generation would remain high (at Overall, so-called own generation by firms—which has around 20 percent) even if power supplies were perfectly been on the rise in recent years—accounts for about 6 reliable, suggesting that other factors, such as emergency percent of installed generation capacity in Sub-Saharan back-up and export regulations, play a critical role in the Africa (equivalent to at least 4,000 MW of installed decision to own a generator. capacity). However, this share doubles to around 12 This paper—a product of the African Sustainable Development Front Office, Africa Region—is part of a larger effort in the region to gauge the status of public expenditure, investment needs, financing sources, and sector performance in the main infrastructure sectors for 24 African focus countries, including energy, information and communication technologies, irrigation, transport, and water and sanitation. Policy Research Working Papers are also posted on the Web at http://econ. worldbank.org. The author may be contacted at jirving@worldbank.org. The Policy Research Working Paper Series disseminates the findings of work in progress to encourage the exchange of ideas about development issues. An objective of the series is to get the findings out quickly, even if the presentations are less than fully polished. The papers carry the names of the authors and should be cited accordingly. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank and its affiliated organizations, or those of the Executive Directors of the World Bank or the governments they represent. Produced by the Research Support Team http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Paying The Price For Unreliable Power Supplies: In-House Generation Of Electricity By Firms In Africa

Loading next page...
 
/lp/unpaywall/paying-the-price-for-unreliable-power-supplies-in-house-generation-of-cJfQwSu243

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

DOI
10.1596/1813-9450-4913
Publisher site
See Book on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper documents the prevalence of in-house percent in the low-income countries, the post-conflict generation of electric power by firms in Sub-Saharan countries, and more generally on the Western side of Africa and attempts to identify the underlying causes. the continent. In a handful of countries own generation The analysis is based on two data sources. The UDI represents more than 20 percent of capacity. World Electric Power Plants Data Base (WEPP), a Rigorous empirical analysis shows that unreliable global inventory of electric power generating units, public power supplies is far from being the only or even provides a detailed inventory of in-house generation at the largest factor driving generator ownership. Firm the country level. The World Bank’s Enterprise Survey characteristics have a major influence—in particular, Database captures business perceptions of the obstacles to the probability of owning a generator doubles in large enterprise growth for 8,483 currently operating firms in firms relative to small ones. Our model predicts that the 25 African countries. prevalence of own generation would remain high (at Overall, so-called own generation by firms—which has around 20 percent) even if power supplies were perfectly been on the rise in recent years—accounts for about 6 reliable, suggesting that other factors, such as emergency percent of installed generation capacity in Sub-Saharan back-up and export regulations, play a critical role in the Africa (equivalent to at least 4,000 MW of installed decision to own a generator. capacity). However, this share doubles to around 12 This paper—a product of the African Sustainable Development Front Office, Africa Region—is part of a larger effort in the region to gauge the status of public expenditure, investment needs, financing sources, and sector performance in the main infrastructure sectors for 24 African focus countries, including energy, information and communication technologies, irrigation, transport, and water and sanitation. Policy Research Working Papers are also posted on the Web at http://econ. worldbank.org. The author may be contacted at jirving@worldbank.org. The Policy Research Working Paper Series disseminates the findings of work in progress to encourage the exchange of ideas about development issues. An objective of the series is to get the findings out quickly, even if the presentations are less than fully polished. The papers carry the names of the authors and should be cited accordingly. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank and its affiliated organizations, or those of the Executive Directors of the World Bank or the governments they represent. Produced by the Research Support Team

Published: May 8, 2009

There are no references for this article.