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ABSORPTION AND UTILIZATION OF IRRADIANCE BY CYANOBACTERIAL MATS IN TWO ICE‐COVERED ANTARCTIC LAKES WITH CONTRASTING LIGHT CLIMATES

ABSORPTION AND UTILIZATION OF IRRADIANCE BY CYANOBACTERIAL MATS IN TWO ICE‐COVERED ANTARCTIC... We investigated the under‐ice light climate and the efficiency with which light was absorbed and utilized by benthic algal mats in Lakes Hoare and Vanda, two perennially ice‐covered lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys area of Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. The ice cover and water column of Lake Vanda were much more transparent than those of Lake Hoare (18% vs. 2% transmission though ice and attenuation coefficients for downwelling irradiance of 0.05 vs. 0.12 m−1, respectively). In both lakes the under‐ice spectra were dominated by blue‐green wavelengths. The benthic flora under perennial ice covers of both lakes comprised thick mucilaginous mats, dominated by cyanobacteria. The mats were well suited to absorb the dominant blue‐green wavelengths of the under‐ice light, with phycoerythrin being present at high concentrations. The pigment systems of the benthic mats absorbed 30%–50% of the light that reached them, varying with depth and lake. There was a tendency for the percentage of absorption to increase as ambient irradiance decreased. The efficiency of utilization of absorbed irradiance was examined by constructing absorbed irradiance/oxygen evolution curves to estimate community quantum yield. Mats from 13 m in Lake Hoare showed the highest quantum yields, approaching 1 mol of carbon fixed for every 8 mol quanta absorbed under light‐limiting conditions. Lake Vanda mats had lower quantum yields, but these increased with depth. Calculated in situ irradiance occasionally exceeded the measured saturating irradiance for oxygen evolution in both lakes, thus efficiency in situ was below the maximum at times. As in other environments, optimization strategies allowed efficient capture and utilization of the lower and middle ranges of experienced irradiance but led to a compromised capacity to use the highest irradiances encountered at each depth. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Phycology Wiley

ABSORPTION AND UTILIZATION OF IRRADIANCE BY CYANOBACTERIAL MATS IN TWO ICE‐COVERED ANTARCTIC LAKES WITH CONTRASTING LIGHT CLIMATES

Journal of Phycology , Volume 37 (1) – Feb 6, 2001

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References (35)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3646
eISSN
1529-8817
DOI
10.1046/j.1529-8817.1999.014012005.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We investigated the under‐ice light climate and the efficiency with which light was absorbed and utilized by benthic algal mats in Lakes Hoare and Vanda, two perennially ice‐covered lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys area of Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. The ice cover and water column of Lake Vanda were much more transparent than those of Lake Hoare (18% vs. 2% transmission though ice and attenuation coefficients for downwelling irradiance of 0.05 vs. 0.12 m−1, respectively). In both lakes the under‐ice spectra were dominated by blue‐green wavelengths. The benthic flora under perennial ice covers of both lakes comprised thick mucilaginous mats, dominated by cyanobacteria. The mats were well suited to absorb the dominant blue‐green wavelengths of the under‐ice light, with phycoerythrin being present at high concentrations. The pigment systems of the benthic mats absorbed 30%–50% of the light that reached them, varying with depth and lake. There was a tendency for the percentage of absorption to increase as ambient irradiance decreased. The efficiency of utilization of absorbed irradiance was examined by constructing absorbed irradiance/oxygen evolution curves to estimate community quantum yield. Mats from 13 m in Lake Hoare showed the highest quantum yields, approaching 1 mol of carbon fixed for every 8 mol quanta absorbed under light‐limiting conditions. Lake Vanda mats had lower quantum yields, but these increased with depth. Calculated in situ irradiance occasionally exceeded the measured saturating irradiance for oxygen evolution in both lakes, thus efficiency in situ was below the maximum at times. As in other environments, optimization strategies allowed efficient capture and utilization of the lower and middle ranges of experienced irradiance but led to a compromised capacity to use the highest irradiances encountered at each depth.

Journal

Journal of PhycologyWiley

Published: Feb 6, 2001

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