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Accepting tobacco industry money for research: has anything changed now that harm reduction is on the agenda?

Accepting tobacco industry money for research: has anything changed now that harm reduction is on... INTRODUCTION The tobacco industry has a long track record of attempting to distort research, while continuing meanwhile to profit from a business which destroys lives on a large scale. Because of this, several major grant‐giving bodies (including the major supporter of cancer research in the United Kingdom, Cancer Research UK) will not provide funding to those in receipt of tobacco industry money. This editorial examines the rationale for this policy in the context of what appear to be efforts by the tobacco industry to rehabilitate itself through harm reduction initiatives and generous ‘no strings’ research grants and Corporate Social Responsibility programmes. CANCER RESEARCH UK’S CODE OF PRACTICE ON TOBACCO INDUSTRY FUNDING OF RESEARCH Cambridge University’s announcement in 1996 that it was setting up the Sheehy Chair of International Relations [named after the retired Chairman of British American Tobacco (BAT)] was greeted with dismay by academics and public health practitioners alike. A predecessor to Cancer Research UK, the Cancer Research Campaign (CRC), felt the need to examine how its funds could be protected from contact with tobacco industry funding. It circulated a consultation document to all UK universities entitled ‘Breaking Addiction to Tobacco Industry Funding’. The CRC received extensive http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Addiction Wiley

Accepting tobacco industry money for research: has anything changed now that harm reduction is on the agenda?

Addiction , Volume 101 (8) – Jan 1, 2006

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References (19)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0965-2140
eISSN
1360-0443
DOI
10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01560.x
pmid
16869833
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION The tobacco industry has a long track record of attempting to distort research, while continuing meanwhile to profit from a business which destroys lives on a large scale. Because of this, several major grant‐giving bodies (including the major supporter of cancer research in the United Kingdom, Cancer Research UK) will not provide funding to those in receipt of tobacco industry money. This editorial examines the rationale for this policy in the context of what appear to be efforts by the tobacco industry to rehabilitate itself through harm reduction initiatives and generous ‘no strings’ research grants and Corporate Social Responsibility programmes. CANCER RESEARCH UK’S CODE OF PRACTICE ON TOBACCO INDUSTRY FUNDING OF RESEARCH Cambridge University’s announcement in 1996 that it was setting up the Sheehy Chair of International Relations [named after the retired Chairman of British American Tobacco (BAT)] was greeted with dismay by academics and public health practitioners alike. A predecessor to Cancer Research UK, the Cancer Research Campaign (CRC), felt the need to examine how its funds could be protected from contact with tobacco industry funding. It circulated a consultation document to all UK universities entitled ‘Breaking Addiction to Tobacco Industry Funding’. The CRC received extensive

Journal

AddictionWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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