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Accusations by Adults of Childhood Sexual Abuse: a Survey of the Members of the British False Memory Society (BFMS)

Accusations by Adults of Childhood Sexual Abuse: a Survey of the Members of the British False... Members of the British False Memory Society (BFMS) were sent a detailed questionnaire concerning accused families and 282 (70%) replied. In this paper the author focuses on the nature, circumstances, and consequences of the accusations for the accused, as well as the role of therapy. The great majority (87%) of the accusers were female and most of the accusations were directed against the biological father. Only four per cent involved stepfathers. Often the accusations were non‐specific and not all were reported as being associated with recovered memories. The accusations appear to have arisen primarily within the context of a therapeutic relationship. Depression, followed by eating disorder, were the most common reasons for seeking therapy. Significant relationship problems were reported as the most common stress factor prior to the accusations being made. The author emphasizes the complex nature of the accusations and distinguishes between beliefs and memories within the context of recovered memories. The reported consequences of the accusations were discontinued contact with the family (59%), legal proceedings being instigated (14%), and the accused person having to seek psychological or psychiatric help because of the stress involved (29%). © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Cognitive Psychology Wiley

Accusations by Adults of Childhood Sexual Abuse: a Survey of the Members of the British False Memory Society (BFMS)

Applied Cognitive Psychology , Volume 11 (1) – Feb 1, 1997

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References (13)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0888-4080
eISSN
1099-0720
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1099-0720(199702)11:1<3::AID-ACP422>3.0.CO;2-U
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Members of the British False Memory Society (BFMS) were sent a detailed questionnaire concerning accused families and 282 (70%) replied. In this paper the author focuses on the nature, circumstances, and consequences of the accusations for the accused, as well as the role of therapy. The great majority (87%) of the accusers were female and most of the accusations were directed against the biological father. Only four per cent involved stepfathers. Often the accusations were non‐specific and not all were reported as being associated with recovered memories. The accusations appear to have arisen primarily within the context of a therapeutic relationship. Depression, followed by eating disorder, were the most common reasons for seeking therapy. Significant relationship problems were reported as the most common stress factor prior to the accusations being made. The author emphasizes the complex nature of the accusations and distinguishes between beliefs and memories within the context of recovered memories. The reported consequences of the accusations were discontinued contact with the family (59%), legal proceedings being instigated (14%), and the accused person having to seek psychological or psychiatric help because of the stress involved (29%). © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Applied Cognitive PsychologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1997

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