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Adaptable Hydrogel Networks with Reversible Linkages for Tissue Engineering

Adaptable Hydrogel Networks with Reversible Linkages for Tissue Engineering Adaptable hydrogels have recently emerged as a promising platform for three‐dimensional (3D) cell encapsulation and culture. In conventional, covalently crosslinked hydrogels, degradation is typically required to allow complex cellular functions to occur, leading to bulk material degradation. In contrast, adaptable hydrogels are formed by reversible crosslinks. Through breaking and re‐formation of the reversible linkages, adaptable hydrogels can be locally modified to permit complex cellular functions while maintaining their long‐term integrity. In addition, these adaptable materials can have biomimetic viscoelastic properties that make them well suited for several biotechnology and medical applications. In this review, an overview of adaptable‐hydrogel design considerations and linkage selections is presented, with a focus on various cell‐compatible crosslinking mechanisms that can be exploited to form adaptable hydrogels for tissue engineering. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Materials Wiley

Adaptable Hydrogel Networks with Reversible Linkages for Tissue Engineering

Advanced Materials , Volume 27 (25) – Jul 1, 2015

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References (359)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
0935-9648
eISSN
1521-4095
DOI
10.1002/adma.201501558
pmid
25989348
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Adaptable hydrogels have recently emerged as a promising platform for three‐dimensional (3D) cell encapsulation and culture. In conventional, covalently crosslinked hydrogels, degradation is typically required to allow complex cellular functions to occur, leading to bulk material degradation. In contrast, adaptable hydrogels are formed by reversible crosslinks. Through breaking and re‐formation of the reversible linkages, adaptable hydrogels can be locally modified to permit complex cellular functions while maintaining their long‐term integrity. In addition, these adaptable materials can have biomimetic viscoelastic properties that make them well suited for several biotechnology and medical applications. In this review, an overview of adaptable‐hydrogel design considerations and linkage selections is presented, with a focus on various cell‐compatible crosslinking mechanisms that can be exploited to form adaptable hydrogels for tissue engineering.

Journal

Advanced MaterialsWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2015

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