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Airborne spectranomics: mapping canopy chemical and taxonomic diversity in tropical forests

Airborne spectranomics: mapping canopy chemical and taxonomic diversity in tropical forests Tree canopies play an enormous role in the maintenance of tropical forest diversity and ecosystem function, and are therefore central to conservation, management, and resource policy development in tropical regions. However, high‐resolution mapping of tropical forest canopies is very difficult, because traditional field, airborne, and satellite measurements cannot resolve the number of canopy species, or particular species of interest, over the large regional scales commensurate with conservation goals and strategies. Newer technologies, such as imaging spectroscopy and light detection and ranging (lidar), are just now reaching performance levels that will allow monitoring of tropical forest diversity from the air, but the methods for applying these technologies are not yet ready. Here, we present concepts that combine chemical and spectral remote sensing perspectives to facilitate canopy diversity mapping. Using examples from our ongoing work in the Hawaiian Islands, we demonstrate how a new “airborne spectranomics” approach could revolutionize tropical forest monitoring in the future. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Wiley

Airborne spectranomics: mapping canopy chemical and taxonomic diversity in tropical forests

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References (37)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Ecological Society of America
ISSN
1540-9295
eISSN
1540-9309
DOI
10.1890/070152
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tree canopies play an enormous role in the maintenance of tropical forest diversity and ecosystem function, and are therefore central to conservation, management, and resource policy development in tropical regions. However, high‐resolution mapping of tropical forest canopies is very difficult, because traditional field, airborne, and satellite measurements cannot resolve the number of canopy species, or particular species of interest, over the large regional scales commensurate with conservation goals and strategies. Newer technologies, such as imaging spectroscopy and light detection and ranging (lidar), are just now reaching performance levels that will allow monitoring of tropical forest diversity from the air, but the methods for applying these technologies are not yet ready. Here, we present concepts that combine chemical and spectral remote sensing perspectives to facilitate canopy diversity mapping. Using examples from our ongoing work in the Hawaiian Islands, we demonstrate how a new “airborne spectranomics” approach could revolutionize tropical forest monitoring in the future.

Journal

Frontiers in Ecology and the EnvironmentWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2009

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