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Association study of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) and childhood‐onset mood disorders

Association study of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) and childhood‐onset... Childhood‐onset mood disorders (COMD) are often familial, and twin studies of COMD provide compelling evidence that genetic factors are involved. Deficits in neural plasticity have been suggested to underlie the development of depression. The receptor tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB) and its ligand, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), play essential roles in neural plasticity, and mRNA expression of both of these genes has been shown to be influenced by stress and chronic antidepressant treatment. In addition, TrkB knock‐out mice display inappropriate stress coping mechanisms. Having previously shown that BDNF is associated with COMD, in this study we investigated the gene encoding TrkB, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (NTRK2) as a susceptibility factor in COMD. We tested for association of NTRK2 with COMD in two independent samples: (a) a case‐control sample matched on ethnicity and gender, consisting of 120 cases who met DSM III/IV criteria for major depressive or dysthymic disorder before age 14 or bipolar I/II before the age of 18, and controls, and (b) a family based control sample of 113 families collected in Hungary, identified by a proband between the age of 7 and 14 who met DSM IV criteria for major depressive disorder or bipolar I/II disorder. There was no evidence for an allelic or genotypic association of three polymorphisms of NTRK2 with COMD in the case‐control sample. Also, in the family based sample, using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), we did not identify any evidence of allelic association for each marker individually or when haplotypes were analyzed. Based on these results, using these three polymorphisms, we do not find support for NTRK2 as a susceptibility gene for COMD. © 2004 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Medical Genetics part B Wiley

Association study of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) and childhood‐onset mood disorders

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References (57)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1552-4841
eISSN
1552-485X
DOI
10.1002/ajmg.b.30084
pmid
15389758
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Childhood‐onset mood disorders (COMD) are often familial, and twin studies of COMD provide compelling evidence that genetic factors are involved. Deficits in neural plasticity have been suggested to underlie the development of depression. The receptor tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB) and its ligand, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), play essential roles in neural plasticity, and mRNA expression of both of these genes has been shown to be influenced by stress and chronic antidepressant treatment. In addition, TrkB knock‐out mice display inappropriate stress coping mechanisms. Having previously shown that BDNF is associated with COMD, in this study we investigated the gene encoding TrkB, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (NTRK2) as a susceptibility factor in COMD. We tested for association of NTRK2 with COMD in two independent samples: (a) a case‐control sample matched on ethnicity and gender, consisting of 120 cases who met DSM III/IV criteria for major depressive or dysthymic disorder before age 14 or bipolar I/II before the age of 18, and controls, and (b) a family based control sample of 113 families collected in Hungary, identified by a proband between the age of 7 and 14 who met DSM IV criteria for major depressive disorder or bipolar I/II disorder. There was no evidence for an allelic or genotypic association of three polymorphisms of NTRK2 with COMD in the case‐control sample. Also, in the family based sample, using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), we did not identify any evidence of allelic association for each marker individually or when haplotypes were analyzed. Based on these results, using these three polymorphisms, we do not find support for NTRK2 as a susceptibility gene for COMD. © 2004 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

American Journal of Medical Genetics part BWiley

Published: Jan 5, 2005

Keywords: genetics; depression; mood disorders; TrkB; NTRK2

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