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AUTOMATIC AT LONDON ZOO SEAL‐FEEDING APPARATUS AT LONDON ZOO

AUTOMATIC AT LONDON ZOO SEAL‐FEEDING APPARATUS AT LONDON ZOO the Seal Rotor, it was discovered that if, by mistake, one of the fish was not correctly released when the flap opened, so that it was hanging temptingly down from the underside of the moving box, the seals would leap out of the water and snatch it in mid-air. T i was hs so spectacular that a new version of the apparatus was constructed incorporating this feature. In the Mark I1 Seal Rotor, the box was replaced by a long arm along which three rows of fish could be placed. Each fish was clamped by its tail so that it could not fall. Now, when the release button was pressed, the flaps for one row of fish opened, but the fish did not fall into the pool. Instead they simply hung m a group from underneath the travelling arm. With this improvement, the seals not only had to chase after the box, but also had to leap repeatedly out of the water to snatch the fish. The Seal Rotor is demonstrated at a fixed time every afternoon throughout the year and has rapidly become a major ‘feeding time’ attraction for the public, in addition to providing the seals with plenty of exercise. The animals are also fed during the morning, but by hand, so that the keeper can make sure that the smaller or weaker seals, which do badly in the afternoon chase, receive sufficient food. It is hoped to introduce other apparatus of this sort, inwhich the animals are made to yerform various activities to obtain their food, for a variety of species throughout the collection. EXPERIMENTAL B U R R O W S F O R SMALL MAMMALS AT L O N D O N ZOO by D. J. Morris Curator of Mammals at London Zoo D U R I N G 1960 an attempt was made to develop a new type of small mammal display cage to exhibit those species which normally spend a great deal of their time underground. Three typeswere successfully completed and installed in the South Mammd House at the London Zoo. The first, for Golden Hamsters, was made from a vertical slab of foam concrete. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

AUTOMATIC AT LONDON ZOO SEAL‐FEEDING APPARATUS AT LONDON ZOO

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 2 (1) – Jan 1, 1961

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1090.1960.tb02731.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the Seal Rotor, it was discovered that if, by mistake, one of the fish was not correctly released when the flap opened, so that it was hanging temptingly down from the underside of the moving box, the seals would leap out of the water and snatch it in mid-air. T i was hs so spectacular that a new version of the apparatus was constructed incorporating this feature. In the Mark I1 Seal Rotor, the box was replaced by a long arm along which three rows of fish could be placed. Each fish was clamped by its tail so that it could not fall. Now, when the release button was pressed, the flaps for one row of fish opened, but the fish did not fall into the pool. Instead they simply hung m a group from underneath the travelling arm. With this improvement, the seals not only had to chase after the box, but also had to leap repeatedly out of the water to snatch the fish. The Seal Rotor is demonstrated at a fixed time every afternoon throughout the year and has rapidly become a major ‘feeding time’ attraction for the public, in addition to providing the seals with plenty of exercise. The animals are also fed during the morning, but by hand, so that the keeper can make sure that the smaller or weaker seals, which do badly in the afternoon chase, receive sufficient food. It is hoped to introduce other apparatus of this sort, inwhich the animals are made to yerform various activities to obtain their food, for a variety of species throughout the collection. EXPERIMENTAL B U R R O W S F O R SMALL MAMMALS AT L O N D O N ZOO by D. J. Morris Curator of Mammals at London Zoo D U R I N G 1960 an attempt was made to develop a new type of small mammal display cage to exhibit those species which normally spend a great deal of their time underground. Three typeswere successfully completed and installed in the South Mammd House at the London Zoo. The first, for Golden Hamsters, was made from a vertical slab of foam concrete.

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1961

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