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Bioinspired Phototropic MXene‐Reinforced Soft Tubular Actuators for Omnidirectional Light‐Tracking and Adaptive Photovoltaics

Bioinspired Phototropic MXene‐Reinforced Soft Tubular Actuators for Omnidirectional... Endowing artificial advanced materials and systems with biomimetic self‐regulatory intelligence is of paramount significance for the development of somatosensory soft robotics and adaptive optoelectronics. Herein, a bioinspired phototropic MXene‐reinforced soft tubular actuator is reported that exhibits omnidirectional self‐orienting ability and is capable of quickly sensing, continuously tracking, and adaptively interacting with incident light in all zenithal and azimuthal angles of 3D space. The novelty of the soft tubular actuator lies in three aspects: 1) the new polymerizable MXene nanomonomer shows high compatibility with liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) matrices and can be in situ photopolymerized into the polymer networks, thus enhancing the mechanical and photoactuation properties; 2) the distinct hollow and radially symmetrical structure facilitates the actuator with fast photoresponsiveness and phototropic performance through retarding the heat conduction along the radial direction; 3) the MXene‐LCE soft tubular actuator simultaneously integrates sensing, actuation, and built‐in feedback loop, thus leading to a high light‐tracking accuracy and adaptive phototropism like a hollow stem of plants in nature. As a proof‐of‐concept demonstration, an adaptive photovoltaic system with solar energy harvesting maximization is illustrated. This work can provide insights into the development of artificial intelligent materials toward adaptive optoelectronics, intelligent soft robotics, and beyond. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Functional Materials Wiley

Bioinspired Phototropic MXene‐Reinforced Soft Tubular Actuators for Omnidirectional Light‐Tracking and Adaptive Photovoltaics

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References (50)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 Wiley‐VCH GmbH
ISSN
1616-301X
eISSN
1616-3028
DOI
10.1002/adfm.202201884
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Endowing artificial advanced materials and systems with biomimetic self‐regulatory intelligence is of paramount significance for the development of somatosensory soft robotics and adaptive optoelectronics. Herein, a bioinspired phototropic MXene‐reinforced soft tubular actuator is reported that exhibits omnidirectional self‐orienting ability and is capable of quickly sensing, continuously tracking, and adaptively interacting with incident light in all zenithal and azimuthal angles of 3D space. The novelty of the soft tubular actuator lies in three aspects: 1) the new polymerizable MXene nanomonomer shows high compatibility with liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) matrices and can be in situ photopolymerized into the polymer networks, thus enhancing the mechanical and photoactuation properties; 2) the distinct hollow and radially symmetrical structure facilitates the actuator with fast photoresponsiveness and phototropic performance through retarding the heat conduction along the radial direction; 3) the MXene‐LCE soft tubular actuator simultaneously integrates sensing, actuation, and built‐in feedback loop, thus leading to a high light‐tracking accuracy and adaptive phototropism like a hollow stem of plants in nature. As a proof‐of‐concept demonstration, an adaptive photovoltaic system with solar energy harvesting maximization is illustrated. This work can provide insights into the development of artificial intelligent materials toward adaptive optoelectronics, intelligent soft robotics, and beyond.

Journal

Advanced Functional MaterialsWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2022

Keywords: adaptive materials; liquid crystal elastomers; MXene nanomonomers; phototropism; soft tubular actuators

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