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‘Brothers in arms’: how men with cancer experience a sense of comradeship through group intervention which combines physical activity with information relay

‘Brothers in arms’: how men with cancer experience a sense of comradeship through group... • The study investigated how a group intervention programme (13 sessions over 16 weeks), designed for men with cancer (n=17), affected their sense of well‐being and had a positive impact on their ability to cope with the physical, psychological and social consequences of living with cancer. The close‐knit relationships fostered between participants stimulated a sense of solidarity and commitment amongst them. • New thinking in relation to gender, group dynamics and social processes is presented, as are the implications for clinical nursing practice in cancer care. The experience from male orientated group intervention programmes shows that men with cancer have undiscovered strengths, whilst some wish to die ‘with their boots on’. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Nursing Wiley

‘Brothers in arms’: how men with cancer experience a sense of comradeship through group intervention which combines physical activity with information relay

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References (36)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0962-1067
eISSN
1365-2702
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2702.2001.00514.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

• The study investigated how a group intervention programme (13 sessions over 16 weeks), designed for men with cancer (n=17), affected their sense of well‐being and had a positive impact on their ability to cope with the physical, psychological and social consequences of living with cancer. The close‐knit relationships fostered between participants stimulated a sense of solidarity and commitment amongst them. • New thinking in relation to gender, group dynamics and social processes is presented, as are the implications for clinical nursing practice in cancer care. The experience from male orientated group intervention programmes shows that men with cancer have undiscovered strengths, whilst some wish to die ‘with their boots on’.

Journal

Journal of Clinical NursingWiley

Published: Jul 20, 2001

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