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Cancer incidence in the African population of Harare, Zimbabwe: Second results from the cancer registry 1993–1995

Cancer incidence in the African population of Harare, Zimbabwe: Second results from the cancer... The data of the population‐based cancer registry in Harare, Zimbabwe, for 1993–1995 are presented and compared with those from 1990–1992. The most significant change in rates is the striking increase in the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in both men and women, compatible with the evolution of the AIDS epidemic in sub‐Saharan Africa. The incidence of KS doubled in both sexes and now accounts for 31.1% of registered cancers. It has overtaken breast cancer to become the second most common tumour in African women, after cervical cancer, and is now one of the leading childhood tumours, accounting for 10.3% of cancers recorded in children (ages 0–14). With the exception of KS, the incidence and pattern of occurrence of the other malignant neoplasms changed little during the observed 6 years. Int. J. Cancer 85:54–59, 2000. © 2000 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Cancer Wiley

Cancer incidence in the African population of Harare, Zimbabwe: Second results from the cancer registry 1993–1995

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References (25)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0020-7136
eISSN
1097-0215
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1097-0215(20000101)85:1<54::AID-IJC10>3.0.CO;2-D
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The data of the population‐based cancer registry in Harare, Zimbabwe, for 1993–1995 are presented and compared with those from 1990–1992. The most significant change in rates is the striking increase in the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in both men and women, compatible with the evolution of the AIDS epidemic in sub‐Saharan Africa. The incidence of KS doubled in both sexes and now accounts for 31.1% of registered cancers. It has overtaken breast cancer to become the second most common tumour in African women, after cervical cancer, and is now one of the leading childhood tumours, accounting for 10.3% of cancers recorded in children (ages 0–14). With the exception of KS, the incidence and pattern of occurrence of the other malignant neoplasms changed little during the observed 6 years. Int. J. Cancer 85:54–59, 2000. © 2000 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

International Journal of CancerWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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