Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cancer statistics

Cancer statistics title for your editorial would have been, “¿Quality Assurance in the Care of the Per son with Cancer.― Ann T. Goldberg, RN, MSN Former Chairman Public Education Committee New Jersey Division American Cancer Society Union, New Jersey ReplybyLawrence Garfinkel: A crudedeathrate isthenumber ofdeaths in a population divided by the population and expressed in terms of deaths per 100,000 population. An age-standardized rate is a rate ad justed to a standard population so that com parisons can be made from year to year. Deaths by five-year age groups are divided by thefive-year group populations age in thestandardopulation use 1970pop p (we ulations) and added across age groups. One cannot then divide the death by the rate to obtain thepopulationorthat f year. Ifone computesa cruderate,henyou shouldbe t able to divide deaths by rate to get the population. In the death rates you cite that were published in Ca for 1969, 1979, 1984, and 1985,the latter threewere age-standard ized rates and do not agree with the US Vital Statistics rates, which are crude rates. The 1969 figure you quoted was a crude rate and isveryclose tothecruderate you show for1970. Cancer Statistics Tothe Editor: I have a question aboutthelatest Cancer Statistics 39:3—20,1989). page 6 (CA On of the January/February issue, the total number of deaths from cancer in the United States during 1985 is listed as 461,563, and the death rate per 100,000 residents as 170.5. From these two numbers, one is able to extrapolate the number of residents in the US during 1985. When I tried to do that, however, I came up with a number well above the real number of residents. The extrapolated numbers for several years werecomparedwiththenumberspublished in Vital Statistics of the United States for 1987. For example, for 1978, these are 238,662,000 and 222,095,000, respec tively; and for 1985, 270,711,000 and 238,741,000, espectively. r The death rates from cancers per 100,000 residents that were published in Ca during the last decade were found to be lowerthanthosepublished inVital Statis tics of the United States. For example. for 1969 the ACS statistics were 160.0, com pared with 162.8 in Vital Statistics; for 1979 the ACS statistics were 169.4, com pared with 183.9 in Vital Statistics; for 1984 the ACS statistics were 170.5, com pared with 193.3 in Vital Statistics; and for 1985 the ACS statistics were 170.5, com pared with 193.3 in Vital Statistics. VOL. 39, NO.6 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 1989 I hope this clarifies the matter. Lawrence Garfinkel, MA Vice President for Epidemiology and Statistics and Director of Cancer Prevention American Cancer Society New York, New York Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer TotheEditor: What are the most recent statistics for non melanoma skin cancer intheUnitedStates, broken down on a state-by-state basis? Victor R. Michalak, MD Hutchinson, Kansas http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/cancer-statistics-3J6tl12DLv

References (0)

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 American Cancer Society
ISSN
0007-9235
eISSN
1542-4863
DOI
10.3322/canjclin.39.6.399
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

title for your editorial would have been, “¿Quality Assurance in the Care of the Per son with Cancer.― Ann T. Goldberg, RN, MSN Former Chairman Public Education Committee New Jersey Division American Cancer Society Union, New Jersey ReplybyLawrence Garfinkel: A crudedeathrate isthenumber ofdeaths in a population divided by the population and expressed in terms of deaths per 100,000 population. An age-standardized rate is a rate ad justed to a standard population so that com parisons can be made from year to year. Deaths by five-year age groups are divided by thefive-year group populations age in thestandardopulation use 1970pop p (we ulations) and added across age groups. One cannot then divide the death by the rate to obtain thepopulationorthat f year. Ifone computesa cruderate,henyou shouldbe t able to divide deaths by rate to get the population. In the death rates you cite that were published in Ca for 1969, 1979, 1984, and 1985,the latter threewere age-standard ized rates and do not agree with the US Vital Statistics rates, which are crude rates. The 1969 figure you quoted was a crude rate and isveryclose tothecruderate you show for1970. Cancer Statistics Tothe Editor: I have a question aboutthelatest Cancer Statistics 39:3—20,1989). page 6 (CA On of the January/February issue, the total number of deaths from cancer in the United States during 1985 is listed as 461,563, and the death rate per 100,000 residents as 170.5. From these two numbers, one is able to extrapolate the number of residents in the US during 1985. When I tried to do that, however, I came up with a number well above the real number of residents. The extrapolated numbers for several years werecomparedwiththenumberspublished in Vital Statistics of the United States for 1987. For example, for 1978, these are 238,662,000 and 222,095,000, respec tively; and for 1985, 270,711,000 and 238,741,000, espectively. r The death rates from cancers per 100,000 residents that were published in Ca during the last decade were found to be lowerthanthosepublished inVital Statis tics of the United States. For example. for 1969 the ACS statistics were 160.0, com pared with 162.8 in Vital Statistics; for 1979 the ACS statistics were 169.4, com pared with 183.9 in Vital Statistics; for 1984 the ACS statistics were 170.5, com pared with 193.3 in Vital Statistics; and for 1985 the ACS statistics were 170.5, com pared with 193.3 in Vital Statistics. VOL. 39, NO.6 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 1989 I hope this clarifies the matter. Lawrence Garfinkel, MA Vice President for Epidemiology and Statistics and Director of Cancer Prevention American Cancer Society New York, New York Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer TotheEditor: What are the most recent statistics for non melanoma skin cancer intheUnitedStates, broken down on a state-by-state basis? Victor R. Michalak, MD Hutchinson, Kansas

Journal

CA: A Cancer Journal for CliniciansWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1989

There are no references for this article.