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Chester's earliest regatta? Edgar's Dee‐rowing revisited

Chester's earliest regatta? Edgar's Dee‐rowing revisited The meeting of the kings of Britain and the Isles at Chester in 973 has usually been interpreted as a submission ritual. The object of this paper is to explore an alternative explanation, that the ritual involved was an egalitarian one of a type commonly used in the Roman world, and subsequently by parties desiring to make peace treaties. Such meetings often took place on rivers, especially those marking borders, as they were regarded as neutral. The location of the 973 meeting on the Dee is examined from this viewpoint. Finally the paper looks at whether the sources for the Dee‐rowing present the event as a display of overlordship by Edgar, and comes to the conclusion that this version of events developed among Benedictine writers from c.1000 onwards, to give lustre to the ruler who had done most to establish Benedictine monasticism in England. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early Medieval Europe Wiley

Chester's earliest regatta? Edgar's Dee‐rowing revisited

Early Medieval Europe , Volume 10 (1) – Mar 1, 2001

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References (29)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2001 Blackwell Publishers Ltd
ISSN
0963-9462
eISSN
1468-0254
DOI
10.1111/1468-0254.00080
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The meeting of the kings of Britain and the Isles at Chester in 973 has usually been interpreted as a submission ritual. The object of this paper is to explore an alternative explanation, that the ritual involved was an egalitarian one of a type commonly used in the Roman world, and subsequently by parties desiring to make peace treaties. Such meetings often took place on rivers, especially those marking borders, as they were regarded as neutral. The location of the 973 meeting on the Dee is examined from this viewpoint. Finally the paper looks at whether the sources for the Dee‐rowing present the event as a display of overlordship by Edgar, and comes to the conclusion that this version of events developed among Benedictine writers from c.1000 onwards, to give lustre to the ruler who had done most to establish Benedictine monasticism in England.

Journal

Early Medieval EuropeWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2001

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