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Child Abuse potential and authoritarianism

Child Abuse potential and authoritarianism This study examined the relationship between child abuse, as measured by the Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory, and authoritarianism, as measured by the Public Opinion Scale (POS). The study also attempted to provide convergent and discriminant validity for the CAP abuse factors rigidity and loneliness by correlating these factors with the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule (EPPS) variables order and affiliation, respectively. Group One consisted of 150 undergraduate students. Group Two consisted of 34 adult students from a second site. For the subjects in both groups, a nonsignificant relationship (p >.05) between abuse scores and authoritarianism was found. In contrast, in both groups significant relationships (p < .05) were found between the CAP abuse factor rigidity and authoritarianism. Additional analysis indicated a significant inverse relationship (p < .05) between the EPPS variable affiliation for Group One, but not for Group Two (p >.05). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Psychology Wiley

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References (22)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-9762
eISSN
1097-4679
DOI
10.1002/1097-4679(198511)41:6<839::AID-JCLP2270410619>3.0.CO;2-X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between child abuse, as measured by the Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory, and authoritarianism, as measured by the Public Opinion Scale (POS). The study also attempted to provide convergent and discriminant validity for the CAP abuse factors rigidity and loneliness by correlating these factors with the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule (EPPS) variables order and affiliation, respectively. Group One consisted of 150 undergraduate students. Group Two consisted of 34 adult students from a second site. For the subjects in both groups, a nonsignificant relationship (p >.05) between abuse scores and authoritarianism was found. In contrast, in both groups significant relationships (p < .05) were found between the CAP abuse factor rigidity and authoritarianism. Additional analysis indicated a significant inverse relationship (p < .05) between the EPPS variable affiliation for Group One, but not for Group Two (p >.05).

Journal

Journal of Clinical PsychologyWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1985

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