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Civil Society and the State: Turkey After the Earthquake

Civil Society and the State: Turkey After the Earthquake On 17 August 1999 Turkey was hit by a massive earthquake. Over 17,000 lives were lost and there was extensive damage to Turkey’s heartland. This paper examines how various public and private institutions, including state and civil society institutions such as NGOs and the media responded to the needs of earthquake survivors. It documents the extensive involvement of NGOs in the relief efforts immediately after the disaster and examines the impact of such participation on state‐civil society relations in the country. The data show that state response to the disaster went through several phases from a period of ineptitude to effective management. The paper credits the media and the NGOs for acting as advocates for survivors and forcing changes at the state level. The paper argues that an ideal response system, which fully addresses the needs of victims, can only be based on state‐civil society relations that are both collaborative and adversarial. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disasters Wiley

Civil Society and the State: Turkey After the Earthquake

Disasters , Volume 26 (2) – Jun 1, 2002

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Overseas Development Institute, 2002
ISSN
0361-3666
eISSN
1467-7717
DOI
10.1111/1467-7717.00196
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On 17 August 1999 Turkey was hit by a massive earthquake. Over 17,000 lives were lost and there was extensive damage to Turkey’s heartland. This paper examines how various public and private institutions, including state and civil society institutions such as NGOs and the media responded to the needs of earthquake survivors. It documents the extensive involvement of NGOs in the relief efforts immediately after the disaster and examines the impact of such participation on state‐civil society relations in the country. The data show that state response to the disaster went through several phases from a period of ineptitude to effective management. The paper credits the media and the NGOs for acting as advocates for survivors and forcing changes at the state level. The paper argues that an ideal response system, which fully addresses the needs of victims, can only be based on state‐civil society relations that are both collaborative and adversarial.

Journal

DisastersWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.