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CLASSIFICATION AND QUANTITATIVE JUDGEMENT

CLASSIFICATION AND QUANTITATIVE JUDGEMENT The investigation is concerned with the effects on judgement of some relations between the manner in which stimuli of a series are classified and the magnitudes of the stimuli. It is shown that when the classification stands in a direct and predictable relation to a physical scale, the stimuli belonging to different classes are judged as farther apart on that scale than in an unclassified series. A classification which is not coherently related to the physical scale does not affect judgement in this manner. There is also evidence in the results that, as a function of past experience with the classification, an increase occurs in the apparent differences between stimuli belonging to different classes, and in the apparent similarity of stimuli belonging to the same class. The relevance of these findings to the general problem of stereotyping is discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Psychology Wiley

CLASSIFICATION AND QUANTITATIVE JUDGEMENT

British Journal of Psychology , Volume 54 (2) – May 1, 1963

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References (15)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1963 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0007-1269
eISSN
2044-8295
DOI
10.1111/j.2044-8295.1963.tb00865.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The investigation is concerned with the effects on judgement of some relations between the manner in which stimuli of a series are classified and the magnitudes of the stimuli. It is shown that when the classification stands in a direct and predictable relation to a physical scale, the stimuli belonging to different classes are judged as farther apart on that scale than in an unclassified series. A classification which is not coherently related to the physical scale does not affect judgement in this manner. There is also evidence in the results that, as a function of past experience with the classification, an increase occurs in the apparent differences between stimuli belonging to different classes, and in the apparent similarity of stimuli belonging to the same class. The relevance of these findings to the general problem of stereotyping is discussed.

Journal

British Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: May 1, 1963

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