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Collection, storage and use of mammalian embryos

Collection, storage and use of mammalian embryos Collection, storage and use of mammalian embryos P. M . S U M M E R S MRCIAFRC Comparative Physiology Research Group, Institute of Zoology, The Zoological Sor2et.y o London, Regent’s Park, London NWI 4R Y. Great Britain f Over the past decade and a half, major advances have occurred in the application of the techniques of embryo collection and transfer in mammals, particularly in domestic animals. T h e techniques have been widely used for commercial purposes to increase the number ofcalves born per year from individual cows with desirable production traits (Seidel & Seidel, 1981). Embryo transfer has bccn used in experiments designed to improve our knowledge of the reproductive physiology of animals, and attention has recently been given to thc possible application of this technology to improving the reproductive capacity of exotic species. Drawing on the work already done in domestic animals rhis paper discusses the technology of collection, storage and use of mammalian embryos, and considers the possibilities and limitations of these techniques to the breeding of endangered species. known or can be extrapolated from closely related domestic animals. Although some mammals are polyovulatory and some are monovulatory, in most species the egg is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Zoo Yearbook Wiley

Collection, storage and use of mammalian embryos

International Zoo Yearbook , Volume 24 (1) – Jan 1, 1986

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References (38)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0074-9664
eISSN
1748-1090
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1090.1985.tb02528.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Collection, storage and use of mammalian embryos P. M . S U M M E R S MRCIAFRC Comparative Physiology Research Group, Institute of Zoology, The Zoological Sor2et.y o London, Regent’s Park, London NWI 4R Y. Great Britain f Over the past decade and a half, major advances have occurred in the application of the techniques of embryo collection and transfer in mammals, particularly in domestic animals. T h e techniques have been widely used for commercial purposes to increase the number ofcalves born per year from individual cows with desirable production traits (Seidel & Seidel, 1981). Embryo transfer has bccn used in experiments designed to improve our knowledge of the reproductive physiology of animals, and attention has recently been given to thc possible application of this technology to improving the reproductive capacity of exotic species. Drawing on the work already done in domestic animals rhis paper discusses the technology of collection, storage and use of mammalian embryos, and considers the possibilities and limitations of these techniques to the breeding of endangered species. known or can be extrapolated from closely related domestic animals. Although some mammals are polyovulatory and some are monovulatory, in most species the egg is

Journal

International Zoo YearbookWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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